7-Storey Graffiti Mural Coming to Vancouver’s Granville Island

Photo sourced from Vancouver Biennale

Photo sourced from Vancouver Biennale

If you’ve been on False Creek lately, they’re hard to miss.

Those giant concrete silos on Granville Island – the ones that tower 70 feet above the water at the Ocean Concrete plant – have gotten a dramatic facelift.  They’ve been painted a rainbow of reds, yellows, pinks, blues and greens as part of one of the largest public art projects the city has ever seen.

World-renowned street artists Osgemeos are using the silos as a 23,500-square-foot canvas for their latest work.  It’s all part of this year’s Vancouver Biennale, the outdoor sculpture and art exhibition that sees dozens of monumental works of art installed on the street, parks and buildings of Metro Vancouver.

Photo sourced from Vancouver Biennale

Photo sourced from Vancouver Biennale

The rainbow-coloured strips on the mural are just the base coat.  In the weeks ahead, Osgemeos – Brazilian brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandalfo – will get to work with spray paint (lots of spray paint) and transform the backdrop into a massive piece of graffiti art. There’s no word yet on what the final creation will look like, but – given the size of the canvas – it will be hard to miss.

Photo credit: Zhatt | Wikimedia Commons

Photo credit: Zhatt | Wikimedia Commons

Osgemeos (literally “The Twins,” in Portuguese) have created street murals around the world and have even been exhibited in London’s Tate Museum and Los Angeles’ Museum of Contemporary Art. Most recently, they applied their graffiti skills to creating a customized Boeing 747 for the FIFA World Cup.

Photo credit: Junichi Ishito | Flickr

Photo credit: Junichi Ishito | Flickr

The Granville Island project – whose final price tag will be around $175,000 – is being partially paid for by a Vancouver Biennale crowdfunding campaign (Osgemeos have largely donated their efforts). Some donors are given the chance to help apply the base coats to the concrete silos in anticipation of the artists’ arrival.  Thus far, the hardest part has been power washing the enormous structures, which were caked with more than a half-century of grime.

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