Giant sharks, matchstick cars and meteorites at Science World’s Ripley’s exhibit!

Before the Internet, Ripley’s Believe It or Not was the world’s most trusted source for weirdness.

Robert Ripley (1890-1949) was a famous collector of oddities, anomalies, and freaky stuff. In the 1930s and ’40s, his discoveries were adapted into a popular radio show. Later, newspapers ran illustrated depictions of discoveries from his collection as part of the funny pages.

Beginning tonight (Jan 25), Science World (1455 Quebec St.) is presenting an exhibit based on Ripley’s discoveries. The Science of Ripley’s Believe It or Not! “celebrates the wonders of science and nature,” according to a media release. The exhibit includes “real artefacts, experiments, touchable specimens, along with computer interactive and multimedia experiences.” It runs until April 22. Here is some of what you can expect.

Crawl through Titanoboa, the largest species of snake to have ever lived! At 15 meters long, this prehistoric snake is as long as a school bus and as heavy as a car. You’ll be invited to crawl through a life-size replica, where you will “hear the snake breathe, and be immersed in the sounds of its digestive system as you learn about its anatomy.”

See the world from the perspective of the world’s tallest man, Robert Wadlow! Wadlow grew to 8 feet 11 inches (2.7 m) tall. When he died at the age of 22, Wadlow was still growing. You’ll learn about his unusual growth.

Gasp! at the jaw of the megalodon, the largest species of shark ever! Growing up to 15 meters long, this prehistoric species was the top marine predator of its time.

There’s lots more, including a meteorite from Mars, a Rolls Royce made from matchsticks, microscopic sculptures, and even the chance to listen to Ripley’s popular Believe It or Not! radio show broadcasts from the 1930s and 1940s. You can hear “a story of survival from the Titanic disaster, listen as a man plays his head like a xylophone, and learn the true story behind the Humpty Dumpty nursery rhyme.”

For more info, visit scienceworld.ca.

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