Dragon in the Garden: Vikram Vij dishes up support for Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden

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Do you love Chinese classical gardens and lion dances or crave a Rajasthani style spicy goat served up to the pulsing sounds of Bhangra? If you answered yes, then Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden’s fundraiser ‘Dragon in the Garden’ September 13 is the place to satisfy your cross-cultural yearnings.

From 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. on September 13, aromas of dishes usually prepared at world-renowned restaurants Vij’s and Rangoli will waft through the air at the intersection of Carrall and East Pender Street.

Fans of Vij’s and the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden will gather for an evening of cultural performance and food during Dragon in the Garden.  Continue reading:
Dragon in the Garden: Vikram Vij dishes up support for Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden

Giant Feast Planned on a Working Farm outside Vancouver

Photo sourced from FarmFolkCityFolk's Facebook Album

Photo sourced from FarmFolkCityFolk’s Facebook Album

You’ve heard of “farm to table” dining.  This is more like “table to farm.”

Feast of Fields – the event where a working farm becomes your smorgasbord for the day – returns to Metro Vancouver on Sept. 7.  Dozens of top chefs, winemakers, brewers, growers and makers will be setting up shop at Delta’s Wellbrook Farm, a 55-acre organic blueberry spread.

Guests, armed with a wine glass and a linen napkin, wander from tent to tent, sampling local produce and cheeses, beer and wine, and prepared dishes from literally dozens of Vancouver-area restaurants.  The idea is to get an education in where real food comes from, while also stuffing your face with some of the best food the region has to offer.  At $95, tickets aren’t cheap, but the event is all-you-can-eat and proceeds go to supporting the local food movement. (Kids 5-19 are only $15; under 5 is free.)

The setting is half the charm. Continue reading:
Giant Feast Planned on a Working Farm outside Vancouver

The Spirit World of Vancouver

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Photo from the Odd Society Spirits website

Given the recent changes to regulations involved with British Columbia liquor laws, the province is now bearing witness to an explosion of distillers launching innovative ventures, particularly around the Lower Mainland.

This evolution in policy moves to allow distillers to be legally able to sell spirits at farmers’ markets and secondary tasting rooms, as well as in grocery stores. The changes also include a more open approach to the universally popular happy hour.

Target objectives around these government mandates include growth of the local economy and an increased focus on British Columbia as a travel destination. What this means for visitors and Vancouverites alike is a thriving craft distillery scene that better supports local entrepreneurs in successfully producing and marketing small batch spirits.

These distillers have risen from a range of backgrounds, but they all share a common vision in creating quality liquor from the best ingredients that the province has to offer.

Continue reading:
The Spirit World of Vancouver

The Session Beer Craze Hits Vancouver

Photo credit: J R | Flickr

Photo credit: J R | Flickr

Among beer drinkers, Vancouver – in fact, the entire Pacific Northwest – has earned a reputation for making incredible West Coast-style IPAs (i.e. India Pale Ales).  These tend to be full-bodied beers, with a higher-than-average alcohol content and an unmistakable hoppiness.

But the thing is IPAs aren’t for everyone.  The bitter taste of the hops turns off lots of drinkers.  Not to mention that the beers can be so heavy – and so strong – that it can be hard to drink more than one or two at a time, especially in the summer heat.

The solution? Session beers.  Facing an IPA backlash, Vancouver microbrewers have turned their attention this summer to producing a crisper, more drinkable style of beer.  I’m not talking about anonymous light beers or the fruit-flavoured suds favoured by the university crowd.  Session beers are rich and flavourful without being overly heavy.  They’re crisp and balanced and – most importantly – you can drink more than one at a time because the alcohol content rarely exceeds five percent.

But I’ll let the pros at Beeradvocate.com describe: Continue reading:
The Session Beer Craze Hits Vancouver

Top 5 Decadent Foods at Vancouver’s 2014 PNE Fair

640px-Deep_frying_chicken_upper_wingThe PNE, Vancouver’s down-home country fair, is in town once again Aug. 16-Sept. 1, delighting crowds with the usual assortment of stomach-rumbling rides, agricultural exhibits and, of course, the most decadent food imaginable.

This year, there are some new additions to the calorie-rich smorgasbord at the fair, as well as many favourites from past years. Here are five decadent foods not to be missed at this year’s PNE.  Hope you’re hungry.

Deep-fried cheesecake at Granny’s Foods: What makes a rich, creamy cheesecake even more delicious? Dunking it a vat of boiling oil, of course.  Granny’s deep-fried cheesecake consists of a small sliver of cake, wrapped in a pastry coating and then fried to a crispy, golden-brown.  Also try delicacies like deep-fried Oreos and even deep-fried Kool-Aid. Continue reading:
Top 5 Decadent Foods at Vancouver’s 2014 PNE Fair