Thailand in Vancouver

Photo from the Maenam website

Photo from the Maenam website

A flight from Vancouver, British Columbia to Bangkok, Thailand is roughly 16 hours, not including the commute to and from the airport, check-in process and potential flight delays. Add to that a solid day or two of jetlag on either side, and you’ve got an enormous travel commitment.

While the mangosteen fruit may not be quite as fresh in Vancouver as they are in Bangkok, it’s possible to experience an authentic taste of Thailand without doing big damage to your credit card, and with the added bonus of sleeping in your own bed. Continue reading:
Thailand in Vancouver

80 films, 11 countries, 11 days: Vancouver’s Biggest Summer Film Fest is Back

DrunktownsFinest-03-thumb-620x322-74813Film buffs in Vancouver are already gearing up for the big Vancouver International Film Festival in late September, which showcases hundreds of films from more than 80 countries.  For those who need their cinema fix a little earlier, however, there is another option.

The Vancouver Queer Film Festival runs from Aug. 14-Aug. 24, screening  the very best in independent queer cinema: 80 films from 11 countries over 11 days at the city’s top theatres.  More than 14,000 people attend every year, making it the second largest film festival in the city.

For powerful filmmaking, original characters and independent points of view, movie lovers need look no further.  Here are five picks from the festival:

Drunktown’s FinestProduced by Robert Redford, this spellbinding film profiles the lives of three Navajo people living on an American reservation.  One of the three people is transgender, adding additional challenges to an already hardscrabble life.  The film’s director and former Navajo resident Sydney Freeland will be on hand for the screening. Sunday, Aug. 17, at 7 p.m. at Cineplex Odeon International Village Cinemas  Continue reading:
80 films, 11 countries, 11 days: Vancouver’s Biggest Summer Film Fest is Back

Hopping Around Vancouver Microbreweries

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Photo from the 33 Acres website

With a comprehensive offering of local ingredients, a notable desire to support local, and evolving provincial liquor laws, Greater Vancouver has seen a surge in microbreweries that shows no sign of slowing down.

Recent government announcements have unveiled plans to phase in the sale of beer, wine and spirits in British Columbia grocery stores and farmers markets, as well as new regulations around happy hour and larger site licenses at music festivals. These developments have seen provincial market shares for artisanal beer double over the past four years, with industry experts forecasting a count of more than 80 active breweries by the end of 2014.

With this, visitors and residents of Vancouver have an inspiring selection of local suds, with many incorporating tasting rooms, growler shops and the inclusion of local food trucks offerings.

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Hopping Around Vancouver Microbreweries

A Midsummer Night’s Dream brings visual exploration of pleasure to Ayden Gallery

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Art by Jane Cheng.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a new exhibit opening at the Ayden Gallery this Friday (Aug 15). The show features work by eight Vancouver artists and illustrators and “is a visual exploration of pleasure,” says curator Pandora Young. “We will be examining aspects of pleasure like, ironically, pain, drive, loss, sensuality, inspiration, and all of us being ladies, femininity.”

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A Midsummer Night’s Dream brings visual exploration of pleasure to Ayden Gallery

The Canadian Cheese Rolling Festival Returns, Aug. 14

https://www.flickr.com/photos/crankworx/9538069731/in/photostream/

Photo credit: Crankworx | Flickr

Looking for some cheesy good fun?

The Canadian Cheese Rolling Festival is back, this Saturday, Aug. 16.  The premise is simple. An 11-pound wheel of Canadian cheese is rolled down a hill near the base Blackcomb Mountain in Whistler. Dozens of competitors – in protective helmets and sometimes ridiculous costumes – chase after it, slipping, tripping and flipping their way down the slope.

Competitive cheese rolling traces its roots to Gloucestershire, England, where aficionados have been chasing cheese wheels down Cooper’s Hill for centuries.  The Whistler version got its start in 2008 and has been getting bigger – and wackier – every year.  This year’s event includes a $500 gift card for best costume, plus a grand prize of two season ski passes for the winner who nabs the wheel of Courtenay Cheddar. Continue reading:
The Canadian Cheese Rolling Festival Returns, Aug. 14