Vancouver, Russian, and Arctic Circle filmmakers featured at this year’s Women in Film festival

A scene from Porcupine Lake, one of the films at this year’s Vancouver International Women in Film Festival.

Adolescent growing pains, military conscription and small-town redemption are among the subjects in films at this year’s Vancouver International Women in Film Festival.

A co-presentation of Women in Film and Television and the VIFF Vancity Theatre, the 13th annual edition runs March 6 to 11. Celebrating the best of cinema created by women. the festival als features  film panels, master classes, guest filmmakers, artist talks, pitch sessions, receptions, and an awards gala. All screenings take place at Vancity Theatre (1181 Seymour St.).

See below for some of the highlights of the festival.

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Vancouver, Russian, and Arctic Circle filmmakers featured at this year’s Women in Film festival

Neurons to Nirvana filmmaker returns with two very unconventional works

Amanda Feilding and her pet pigeon.

Oliver Hockenhull’s From Neurons to Nirvana received quite a bit of attention in underground film circles. Now the Vancouver filmmaker is back with two films, one of which is about a pioneering drug reformer who also happens to be descended from British aristocracy and who once drilled a hole in her own head.

I Am My Own Laboratory is an experimental documentary about Amanda Feilding, Countess of Wemyss and March and amateur trepanner. The other film, Shot On Blood: Kozmikomic Electronica is even more experimental. Both expand upon the themes and ideas of From Neurons to Nirvana, and Vancity Theatre (1181 Seymour St.) is screening them on Jan. 28. The screening will include a Q-and-A with Hockenhull. See below for more info on the two films.

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Neurons to Nirvana filmmaker returns with two very unconventional works

Exorcisms, love at first sight and Italy’s answer to Breaking Bad at this year’s Italian Film Festival

Matilda de Angelis is featured in the 2016 movie Veloce come il vento (Italian Race), which screens at this year’s Italian Film Festival.

A couple Fellinis, three Tavianis, a Rossellini and a Bertolucci. It must be time for the Italian Film Festival.

Each year, the festival screens old, restored and new films by Italian filmmakers. This year’s runs Jan. 5-11 and features classics, documentaries and examples of new Italian cinema. Screenings take place at Vancity Theatre (1181 Seymour St.). Here are some highlights.

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Exorcisms, love at first sight and Italy’s answer to Breaking Bad at this year’s Italian Film Festival

Filming in Vancouver: Chris Hemsworth, Jeff Bridges, Deadly Class, Handmaid’s Tale, and more

Chris Hemsworth will be bringing his thunder from Down Under to Vancouver.

In this week’s roundup of what’s going on in Vancouver’s screen scene, we’ve learned that the God of Thunder and the man who freed Tron are teaming up in a new movie—so to speak.

Elsewhere in the city, a deadly graphic novel will get a home-screen adaptation and several filmmakers will be making appearances at the Vancouver International Film Festival.

With time ticking away, let’s get to it, shall we?

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Filming in Vancouver: Chris Hemsworth, Jeff Bridges, Deadly Class, Handmaid’s Tale, and more

Vancouver-made docudrama about Canada’s forgotten Evel Knievel opens today

Aim for the Roses is a 2016 docudrama that tells the story of Canadian stuntman Ken Carter.

Aim for the Roses is a 2016 docudrama that tells the story of Canadian stuntman Ken Carter.

A new Vancouver-made documentary about an obscure but ambitious Canadian stuntman begins its Vancouver theatrical run today, Dec. 2, at Vancity Theatre.

Aim for the Roses has been described as “Errol Morris and Philip Glass meets Super Dave Osborne” – that is, a film that combines the vision and/or investigative abilities of an incisive documentarian with the musical acumen of a neo-classical composer brought to bear on the subject of a semi-amateur, showboating daredevil/stuntman. We’re not sure about that. What we do know is that, to some, Ken Carter – the film’s subject (and not to be confused with the American basketball coach) – is the Canadian Evel Knievel, and filmmaker John Bolton’s docudrama tells his story, as well as the story of one of his biggest fans.

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Vancouver-made docudrama about Canada’s forgotten Evel Knievel opens today

See the Turkish cat film Variety called “magical and remarkable”

A tense scene from the Turkish documentary Kedi.

A tense scene from the Turkish documentary Kedi.

A documentary about what it’s like to be a cat in Istanbul is coming to town as part of the Turkish Film Festival.

First screened to three sold-out houses with this year’s Vancouver International Film Festival, Kedi chronicles the lives of Istanbul’s cat population. The acclaimed “furcumentary” (sorry/not sorry!) uses innovative filming techniques to bring audiences eye-to-eye with its four-legged protagonists. Kedi has been described as “a must-see for animal lovers—or simply—anyone who feels like taking a stroll in the nostalgic neighbourhoods of Istanbul.” It’s one of a number of delights screening as part of this year’s Turkish Film Festival (Nov. 25-27 at Vancity Theatre, 1181 Seymour St.). And it’s not even the only cat film!

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See the Turkish cat film Variety called “magical and remarkable”

‘How perfectly ripping!’ A glimpse of Vancouver over the decades

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From Vancouver: Exponential Change.

A new collection of vintage film clips shows us how Vancouverites have spent their leisure hours over the years. A 1928 home-made melodrama, a ribald mid-century PNE, a promotional film extolling a Vancouver Honeymoon, and clips from Expo 86 and Vancouver’s centennial celebrations are among the highlights of Vancouver: Exponential Change.

Featuring newly digitized film and video, the collection was put together by the City of Vancouver Archives as part of an annual series. Vancouver: Exponential Change screens at Vancity Theatre (1181 Seymour St.) Nov. 20, along with the 2014 selection Vancouver – A Progressive City, and Nov. 27. But wait, there’s more!

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‘How perfectly ripping!’ A glimpse of Vancouver over the decades