First Nations dance companies perform at free event this Saturday

Vertical dance company Aeriosa will perform this Saturday June 10 at Dance Centre. They’ll present an adapted version of their 2015 collaboration Trees Are Portals.

This Saturday, Ancestralizing the Present will “explore how First Nations protocol informs collaborations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous dance artists,” according to the press release. For people interested or curious about First Nations dance, it’s a chance to catch some of the West Coast’s finest practitioners.

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First Nations dance companies perform at free event this Saturday

What to see at this year’s Vancouver International Dance Festival

Japanese dance company Dairakudakan

Japan’s Dairakudakan performs as part of this year’s Vancouver International Dance Festival.

Even if you don’t know a pirouette from a Pirelli, the 2017 Vancouver International Dance Festival has something to boggle the mind, and inflame the senses.

A showcase for local and international choreographers, performers and companies, the VIDF is a hotly-anticipated annual event. This year, from March 1-25, 14 different companies will perform at various venues. Here’s a preview of some of the pieces during the festival’s 17th edition.

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What to see at this year’s Vancouver International Dance Festival

Don’t be that person who’s like, ‘Aw nuts, I missed the Nutcracker!’

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Good news, slowpokes; there are still tickets left for The Nutcracker. The Royal Winnipeg Ballet production, co-presented with Ballet BC, is in town for five performances, from Dec. 8-11 (matinee only on the 11th) at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre (650 Hamilton St.).

For many dance fans, and folks who just plain love a Christmas-y spectacle, RWB’s Nutcracker is a holiday tradition. Besides the Tchaikovsky score, the beautiful dancing and gorgeous costumes, the ballet had been Canadian-ized to include a snowy pond hockey game and a battle on Parliament Hill.

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Don’t be that person who’s like, ‘Aw nuts, I missed the Nutcracker!’

All-day dance action returning to Robson Square!

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Ready to bust a move in the middle of downtown Vancouver?

The fifth year of the Vancouver Street Dance Festival is upon us. The outdoor, all-ages, event features dance battles, live music and DJs, with the main action Saturday July 30 at Robson Square (800 Robson St.) from 11 a.m.-8 p.m.

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All-day dance action returning to Robson Square!

Highlights of this year’s Vancouver International Dance Festival

LiftUp-Sebastian Pena

The Canadian premieres of Possible Impossible and Crisálida, two co-productions from Sweden’s Memory Wax and Cuba’s Danza Teatro Retazos, are among the highlights of this year’s Vancouver International Dance Festival.

From Feb. 28 – March 19, the 2016 VIDF will host dancers from Sweden, Cuba, Japan, Quebec, Ontario, and Vancouver in an impressive array of world, West Coast, and Canadian premieres. Here are some highlights.

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Highlights of this year’s Vancouver International Dance Festival

Five reasons to get out of bed in February

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Whoo-hoo! Let’s hear it for February!

This underrated month – stuck between the post-holiday doldrums of January and the waiting-for-springness of March – has a lot going for it. Valentine’s Day and, uhm, well – it’s also the shortest month. So there’s that.

Plus, there’s always something happening in the worlds of theatre, dance, comedy and music. Here are a few highlights with nothing much in common but, perhaps, their ability to remind us that February isn’t so bad after all.

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Five reasons to get out of bed in February

Big talent, small stage – see Ballet BC dancers up close and personal!

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Dancers featured in Dances for a Small Stage 32.

A Ballet BC dancer, a former member of the Nederlands Dans Theater and a Vancouver burlesque star are just a few reasons to check out the 32nd Dances for a Small Stage.

The series has long been known for bringing the rarefied world of contemporary dance to a new audience who might not know Balanchine from Ballantine’s.

By pairing a diverse array of dancers with musicians and other collaborators, by having them inhabit a postage-stamp space that is often near the audience, and by performing bite-size chunks of about five-to-seven minutes apiece, Dances for a Small Stage makes accessible art that even non-dance aficionados can enjoy.

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Big talent, small stage – see Ballet BC dancers up close and personal!