Bloodied But Unbowed looks back at glory days of Vancouver punk

D.O.A., in the early days of Vancouver punk.

Filmgoers and music fans will have a chance to see two rarely-screened movies this month, including one about the early days of the Vancouver punk scene.

Bloodied But Unbowed is director Susanne Tabata’s look back at the city and its explosion of musical creativity in the late seventies and early eighties. It screens Jan 29.

And on Jan. 24, Vancity Theatre is showing Border Radio. It’s a 1987 indie road movie starring L.A. punk musicians, including John Doe of X, and directed by the woman who would make Wayne’s World. Here’s a closer look at the two films.

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Bloodied But Unbowed looks back at glory days of Vancouver punk

Vancouver-made docudrama about Canada’s forgotten Evel Knievel opens today

Aim for the Roses is a 2016 docudrama that tells the story of Canadian stuntman Ken Carter.

Aim for the Roses is a 2016 docudrama that tells the story of Canadian stuntman Ken Carter.

A new Vancouver-made documentary about an obscure but ambitious Canadian stuntman begins its Vancouver theatrical run today, Dec. 2, at Vancity Theatre.

Aim for the Roses has been described as “Errol Morris and Philip Glass meets Super Dave Osborne” – that is, a film that combines the vision and/or investigative abilities of an incisive documentarian with the musical acumen of a neo-classical composer brought to bear on the subject of a semi-amateur, showboating daredevil/stuntman. We’re not sure about that. What we do know is that, to some, Ken Carter – the film’s subject (and not to be confused with the American basketball coach) – is the Canadian Evel Knievel, and filmmaker John Bolton’s docudrama tells his story, as well as the story of one of his biggest fans.

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Vancouver-made docudrama about Canada’s forgotten Evel Knievel opens today

Documentary about historic Vancouver park to screen at Vancity

VLAFF_BalladOfOppenheimerPark

Juan Manuel Sepúlveda spent two years hanging out in Vancouver’s Oppenheimer Park in the Downtown Eastside. The director got to know its regulars while letting his camera roll. The result is The Ballad of Oppenheimer Park, a documentary about the park and the daily lives of some of the people who spend time there.

On Sept. 1, Vancity Theatre (1181 Seymour St.) will screen the documentary that the Hollywood Reporter calls “an intimate group portrait that can be both heartbreaking and hilarious, focusing on a few lost souls banding together against the raw deal handed to their tribes.’’

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Documentary about historic Vancouver park to screen at Vancity