Vancouver, Russian, and Arctic Circle filmmakers featured at this year’s Women in Film festival

A scene from Porcupine Lake, one of the films at this year’s Vancouver International Women in Film Festival.

Adolescent growing pains, military conscription and small-town redemption are among the subjects in films at this year’s Vancouver International Women in Film Festival.

A co-presentation of Women in Film and Television and the VIFF Vancity Theatre, the 13th annual edition runs March 6 to 11. Celebrating the best of cinema created by women. the festival als features  film panels, master classes, guest filmmakers, artist talks, pitch sessions, receptions, and an awards gala. All screenings take place at Vancity Theatre (1181 Seymour St.).

See below for some of the highlights of the festival.

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Vancouver, Russian, and Arctic Circle filmmakers featured at this year’s Women in Film festival

Film retrospective includes movies with Jagger, Bowie… and Garfunkel

Stand-ins for Albert Einstein and Marilyn Monroe discuss the theory of relativity in Nicolas Roeg’s 1985 movie Insignificance.

“All you’re doing in a film really is saying: this is what, and how, I think — is there anybody out there?”—Nicolas Roeg

This year, one of England’s most eclectic, controversial film directors turns 90.

To celebrate, the Cinematheque (1131 Howe St.) is presenting Out There: The Visionary Cinema of Nicolas Roeg. From Feb. 17 – March 4, the retrospective will screen several of the director’s films, many in 35mm prints. The slate includes his best-known works, such as Performance (starring Mick Jagger), Don’t Look Now (featuring one of the most famous sex scenes in cinematic history), The Witches (based on a Roald Dahl novel, and starring Angelica Huston) The Man Who Fell to Earth (with David Bowie as an alien).

But there are also some lesser-known Roeg works in the retrospective. Below is a look at those films, including Insignificance, Walkabout, Eureka and The Witches. (Click on film titles for trailers.)

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Film retrospective includes movies with Jagger, Bowie… and Garfunkel

Bloodied But Unbowed looks back at glory days of Vancouver punk

D.O.A., in the early days of Vancouver punk.

Filmgoers and music fans will have a chance to see two rarely-screened movies this month, including one about the early days of the Vancouver punk scene.

Bloodied But Unbowed is director Susanne Tabata’s look back at the city and its explosion of musical creativity in the late seventies and early eighties. It screens Jan 29.

And on Jan. 24, Vancity Theatre is showing Border Radio. It’s a 1987 indie road movie starring L.A. punk musicians, including John Doe of X, and directed by the woman who would make Wayne’s World. Here’s a closer look at the two films.

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Bloodied But Unbowed looks back at glory days of Vancouver punk

Best Canadian flicks of 2017 features Vancouver talent, screening this weekend

A still from the Canadian feature Never Steady, Never Still.

What happened in Canadian cinema in 2017? Glad you asked.

This month, Cinematheque (1131 Howe St.) is presenting TIFF’s annual Canada’s Top Ten Film Festival (Jan. 12-21). The festival is a showcase of the year’s best feature-length films and shorts, as determined by the Toronto International Film Festival.

Here’s a look at what’s screening this weekend, Jan 12-14.

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Best Canadian flicks of 2017 features Vancouver talent, screening this weekend

Canadian picks at this year’s Vancouver International Film Festival

A scene from the BC-shot Suck It Up.

While the Toronto International Film Festival premieres many of the high-profile, Oscar-baiting Hollywood releases, the Vancouver International Film Festival has carved a niche for itself by emphasizing Canadian and foreign releases. This year’s Canadian slate includes feature films and documentaries in the True North program as well as films by emerging filmmakers in the Future//Present series. Here’s a look at a few of the more notable Canadian releases screening at the fest, which runs Sept. 28-Oct 13 at various theatres in town.

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Canadian picks at this year’s Vancouver International Film Festival

Sock puppets, an octopus and more at the NSFW film fest for the open-minded adult

Short, sexy films covering workplace power dynamics, playful doggie cosplay, and a dreamy animated octopus are coming to Vancouver this weekend.

Born and bred in the great Pacific Northwest, Dan Savage’s HUMP! Film Festival has been bringing audiences a new kind of porn since 2005.

The annual short film festival features erotic and explicit clips from amateur filmmakers. Popular syndicated sex columnist Dan Savage curates the sex-positive program, which is an all-inclusive cornucopia of body types, shapes, ages, colours, sexualities, genders, kinks, and fetishes.

The annual festival premieres a new program each fall in Seattle and Portland. In the meantime, however, the touring edition of the 12th annual compilation is coming to Vancouver’s Rio Theatre this weekend, Sept. 14-16. Read about some of the NSFW entries below.

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Sock puppets, an octopus and more at the NSFW film fest for the open-minded adult

Historic tennis match, the first oil-painted animated feature, and the new one from the director of The Lobster—highlights of this year’s Vancouver International Film Festival

Isabelle Huppert (third from left) stars in Michael Haneke’s latest armrest-gripper, Happy End.

Vancouver audiences will get their first peek at the high-profile Borg Vs. McEnroe  at this year’s Vancouver International Film Festival (Sept. 28-Oct 13). But there are plenty of other films to watch for in this year’s lineup, including new films from controversial director Michael Haneke (Funny Games, Cache), Ruben Östlund (Force Majeure, a favourite on the 2014 festival circuit), and Yorgos Lanthimos. You may recall Lanthimos from 2015’s rather unorthodox The Lobster, one of the most divisive movies in recent memory.

Scroll down for more on the above movies, as well as other highlights of the Special Presentation series.

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Historic tennis match, the first oil-painted animated feature, and the new one from the director of The Lobster—highlights of this year’s Vancouver International Film Festival