Film retrospective includes movies with Jagger, Bowie… and Garfunkel

Stand-ins for Albert Einstein and Marilyn Monroe discuss the theory of relativity in Nicolas Roeg’s 1985 movie Insignificance.

“All you’re doing in a film really is saying: this is what, and how, I think — is there anybody out there?”—Nicolas Roeg

This year, one of England’s most eclectic, controversial film directors turns 90.

To celebrate, the Cinematheque (1131 Howe St.) is presenting Out There: The Visionary Cinema of Nicolas Roeg. From Feb. 17 – March 4, the retrospective will screen several of the director’s films, many in 35mm prints. The slate includes his best-known works, such as Performance (starring Mick Jagger), Don’t Look Now (featuring one of the most famous sex scenes in cinematic history), The Witches (based on a Roald Dahl novel, and starring Angelica Huston) The Man Who Fell to Earth (with David Bowie as an alien).

But there are also some lesser-known Roeg works in the retrospective. Below is a look at those films, including Insignificance, Walkabout, Eureka and The Witches. (Click on film titles for trailers.)

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Film retrospective includes movies with Jagger, Bowie… and Garfunkel

Explorers of the Year, a daring mother-daughter team and more at this year’s Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival

A scene from Martina and Tania Halik’s Epic Coast Mountain Adventure.

With 40 shows in eight venues, this year’s Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival is the biggest yet. The annual event will screen 83 films, and host 44 speakers. These range from an Iranian woman who has become a symbol of moutain-climbing freedom, the first man to paddle-board across an ocean, and a mother-daughter team who spent five months traversing the Coast Mountains.

See below for more info on some of the guests coming to this year’s VIMFF.

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Explorers of the Year, a daring mother-daughter team and more at this year’s Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival

Five reasons to not miss The Descent this Sunday at the Rio

Cast of the 2006 British horror film The Descent. A special screening this Sunday at the Rio features director Neil Marshall introducing the film and answering questions after the screening.

Horror movie fans, or fans of nail-biting suspense thrillers featuring strong female leads, won’t want to miss a special screening this Sunday May 7 at the Rio Theatre (1661 E. Broadway).

The Vancouver independent will show The Descent, a classic of British horror, with director Neil Marshall in attendance. Here are four more reasons to catch the 1996 film in this special screening.

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Five reasons to not miss The Descent this Sunday at the Rio

Where to see holiday movies in Vancouver this Christmas season!

A scene from Bad Santa, a foul-mouthed holiday classic.

Traditionally, Christmas is a great time to catch up on movie-viewing – whether new films the studios have saved up for Oscar consideration, holiday blockbusters, or titles you might have missed that have made critics’ year-end best-of lists.

It’s also a good time to catch Christmas classics on the big screen. In Vancouver, the city’s arthouse theatres all have varied programs, from Cinematheque’s Essential Cinema to Vancity’s Best of 2016 to Rio Theatre’s – well, as usual, anything goes when it comes to the licensed East Vancouver moviehouse.

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Where to see holiday movies in Vancouver this Christmas season!

Where to see horror movies this month in Vancouver

Boris Karloff stars in the classic 1931 horror film Frankenstein.

Boris Karloff stars in the classic 1931 horror film Frankenstein.

Everyone likes a good scare, right? As befits our approach to Halloween, Vancouver’s independent theatres are rolling out the blood-soaked carpet to all those who appreciate fright films. Here are some highlights of what you can seen in the dark, with a roomful of strangers and only a pail of popcorn to stave off an ever-mounting dread.

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Where to see horror movies this month in Vancouver

Vancouver (and B.C.) on film

Wasp, Thunderbird and Grizzly Bear dancers perform in the bows of the three canoes as the groom's party approaches the village of the bride's father. Photograph by Edward Schwinke.  IN THE LAND OF THE HEAD HUNTERS (1914). The film has been restored by UCLA Film & Television Archives in association with the Field Museum of Natural History and Milestone Film and VIdeo.

Wasp, Thunderbird and Grizzly Bear dancers perform in the bows of the three canoes as the groom’s party approaches the village of the bride’s father. Photograph by Edward Schwinke. IN THE LAND OF THE HEAD HUNTERS (1914). The film has been restored by UCLA Film & Television Archives in association with the Field Museum of Natural History and Milestone Film and VIdeo.

This is a great time to see some examples of Vancouver on film.

The first movie shot in B.C., a jazzy/beatnik student-made film from the 1960s, an archival look at the city’s history and a new documentary about a vanishing neighbourhood are all being screened in town this weekend and next.

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Vancouver (and B.C.) on film