Giant Feast Planned on a Working Farm outside Vancouver

Photo sourced from FarmFolkCityFolk's Facebook Album

Photo sourced from FarmFolkCityFolk’s Facebook Album

You’ve heard of “farm to table” dining.  This is more like “table to farm.”

Feast of Fields – the event where a working farm becomes your smorgasbord for the day – returns to Metro Vancouver on Sept. 7.  Dozens of top chefs, winemakers, brewers, growers and makers will be setting up shop at Delta’s Wellbrook Farm, a 55-acre organic blueberry spread.

Guests, armed with a wine glass and a linen napkin, wander from tent to tent, sampling local produce and cheeses, beer and wine, and prepared dishes from literally dozens of Vancouver-area restaurants.  The idea is to get an education in where real food comes from, while also stuffing your face with some of the best food the region has to offer.  At $95, tickets aren’t cheap, but the event is all-you-can-eat and proceeds go to supporting the local food movement. (Kids 5-19 are only $15; under 5 is free.)

The setting is half the charm. Continue reading:
Giant Feast Planned on a Working Farm outside Vancouver

France in Vancouver

Photo from the Pied-à-Terre website

Photo from the Pied-à-Terre website

From Vincent Cassel to tea and pastries at Ladurée, the reasons to embrace life as a Francophile are plentiful. While feeding this love may typically involve a flight to Charles de Gaulle, satiation of this desire does not have to involve a stamp in your passport as Vancouver boasts an impressive array of all things French.

Continue reading:
France in Vancouver

5 Can’t-Miss Shows at the 2014 Vancouver Fringe Festival

8799490Vancouver’s weirdest theatre fest of the year is back.

The 2014 Vancouver Fringe Festival brings nearly 100 off-beat and experimental theatre acts to Granville Island, Sept. 4-Sept. 14.  Over the course of 11 days of over-the-top thespian excitement, they’ll stage more than 700 performances in venues ranging from traditional theatres to cafes and even “site-specific” places, which in the past have included fire escapes and bicycles.

First held back in 1985, the Fringe has grown into one of the city’s largest theatre festivals, drawing more than 30,000 attendees every year. Its unique format (many acts are drawn at random, literally from a hat) gives all artists, from novices to veteran actors, a chance to participate, while bringing new, adventurous and often hilarious theatre to audiences. The price is right, too: All regular-priced tickets are $14.

Here are a few shows not to be missed at this year’s Fringe Fest: Continue reading:
5 Can’t-Miss Shows at the 2014 Vancouver Fringe Festival

Passes on Sale for 2014 Vancouver International Film Fest: Sneak Peek

Charlie's Country

Charlie’s Country

The best of world cinema is coming to Vancouver, again.

The 33rd instalment of the Vancouver International Film Festival is just around the corner, Sept. 25-Oct. 10.  The two-week-plus fest highlights more than 300 edgy, thought-provoking, award-winning films from more than 70 countries.  An estimated 130,000 cinema buffs are expected to turn out to see the films at seven theatres across the city, from intimate Cinematheque on Howe Street to the cavernous Centre for the Performing Arts on Homer Street.

All those moviegoers means one thing: You better get your tickets fast.  Festival passes and ticket packs are officially on sale as of Aug. 18 on the Vancouver International Film Festival website.  The full festival program isn’t available until Sept. 4 (when the advance box office opens for individual ticket sales), but organizers have already revealed a selection of Cannes award winners and highlights that will be shown in Vancouver.  Here are a few early can’t-miss picks: Continue reading:
Passes on Sale for 2014 Vancouver International Film Fest: Sneak Peek

The Session Beer Craze Hits Vancouver

Photo credit: J R | Flickr

Photo credit: J R | Flickr

Among beer drinkers, Vancouver – in fact, the entire Pacific Northwest – has earned a reputation for making incredible West Coast-style IPAs (i.e. India Pale Ales).  These tend to be full-bodied beers, with a higher-than-average alcohol content and an unmistakable hoppiness.

But the thing is IPAs aren’t for everyone.  The bitter taste of the hops turns off lots of drinkers.  Not to mention that the beers can be so heavy – and so strong – that it can be hard to drink more than one or two at a time, especially in the summer heat.

The solution? Session beers.  Facing an IPA backlash, Vancouver microbrewers have turned their attention this summer to producing a crisper, more drinkable style of beer.  I’m not talking about anonymous light beers or the fruit-flavoured suds favoured by the university crowd.  Session beers are rich and flavourful without being overly heavy.  They’re crisp and balanced and – most importantly - you can drink more than one at a time because the alcohol content rarely exceeds five percent.

But I’ll let the pros at Beeradvocate.com describe: Continue reading:
The Session Beer Craze Hits Vancouver

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