The Aboriginal Pavilion and the Mystery of the Inexplicable Queue

Rose Julian of the Wabanaki peoples performs at the Aboriginal Pavilion.

To the Bermuda Triangle, UFOs and Atlantis, we may now add this unsolved mystery from the Vancouver 2010 Games.

The inexplicable queue.

I’ve seen it happen again and again over the last two weeks.  Extraordinary lines form in front of Olympic houses and attractions that offer nothing out of the ordinary.  Meanwhile, fascinating exhibits go unnoticed, appreciated only by the intrepid few who dare to ditch the queues and blaze their own way through the Olympic jungle.

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The Aboriginal Pavilion and the Mystery of the Inexplicable Queue

Canada’s Aboriginal People Welcome Olympic Fans . . . and Fill their Bellies

Canada's Aboriginal people, official hosts of the 2010 Games, are welcoming the world with song, dance and some innovative native cuisine.

The 2010 Vancouver Games mark the first Olympics ever in which Aboriginal communities have participated as full partners.  The Games are being held on the traditional lands of the Lil’wat, Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh peoples, collectively known as the Four Host First Nations.   And at the Aboriginal pavilion downtown, a massive longhouse crowned with a 65-foot-high dome, they have been busy welcoming the world.  Demonstrations of traditional arts and dancing offer a window on Aboriginal life.  But – as is so often the case – one of the best ways for visitors to get acquainted with the new culture is through the food.

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Canada’s Aboriginal People Welcome Olympic Fans . . . and Fill their Bellies