Find a Birding Spot Near Vancouver on the BC Bird Trail

Northern Flicker woodpecker

Northern Flicker Woodpecker. Photo Scottslm on Pixabay.

Did you know that British Columbia is on the Pacific Flyway, a major north-south migration route for birds flying between Alaska and Patagonia? That means that the Vancouver area is a great spot to go birding! The BC Bird Trail is a new initiative designed to help you find the best places to bird watch across BC. To get you started, here are a few BC Bird Trail locations near Vancouver.

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Find a Birding Spot Near Vancouver on the BC Bird Trail

Look! Up in the sky! It’s a bird! No, it’s the inaugural Vancouver International Bird Festival…

The rare Philippine Eagle is the subject of the documentary Bird of Prey, screening at Science World as part of the first Vancouver International Bird Festival.

The birds are coming. And they’re bigger, badder and beakier than ever.

Besides being a popular pastime in North America, Japan and Europe, birdwatching has spawned over 200 festivals in the U.S. and Canada. This year, to coincide with the 27th International Ornithological Congress at the Vancouver Convention Centre, the inaugural Vancouver International Bird Festival takes place (Aug. 19 to 26).

It will be the biggest bird festival ever held in Canada. The Congress expects to attract 3,000, while the festival is expected to bring 30,000 birdwatchers, nature lovers, and outdoor enthusiasts to events in and around the city. (According to Wiki, as of July of this year, 576 species have been documented in B.C.) Events include Return of the Hipster Birdwatcher, bird-themed improv comedy, and a talk by Jennifer Ackerman, author of the bestselling The Genius of Birds.

Here are some highlights of the festival.

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Look! Up in the sky! It’s a bird! No, it’s the inaugural Vancouver International Bird Festival…

Fairmont Vancouver Airport hosts two unique ‘Room & Bird’ packages for nature lovers

The Fairmont Vancouver Airport goes to the birds with their new 'Room & Bird' packages.

The Fairmont Vancouver Airport goes to the birds with their new ‘Room & Bird’ packages.

Located where high fliers – large and small, human and avian – gather daily, the Fairmont Vancouver Airport is hosting two unique birder-friendly packages.

It’s only natural that the Fairmont Vancouver Airport has organized two bird-based getaways. The hotel is located in the Fraser River estuary – home to the Pacifc Coast flyaway, a popular stopover for birds migrating from over 20 countries and three continents. Waterfowl and shorebirds from breeding grounds in Siberia, Alaska, Yukon, and other arctic and prairie areas all stop to refuel in the area on their way to warmer wintering grounds.

Dubbed their ‘Room & Bird’ packages, the number one ranked Airport Hotel in North America will entice naturalists and birders alike with two exclusive, field-trip based birding stays at the hotel.

Partnering with local conservation group WildResearch and Swarovski Optik, the two birding vacations include guided trips, use of luxury binoculars, accommodation at the hotel and meals.

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Fairmont Vancouver Airport hosts two unique ‘Room & Bird’ packages for nature lovers

For the Birds: World-class bird watching on Vancouver’s doorstep

Photo credit: USFWS Headquarters | Flickr

I’m staring at a regal, metre-tall sandhill crane, its slender legs knee-deep in a seaside marsh outside of Vancouver.  It sizes me up with its bright pink head – flamboyant colors worthy of a flamingo – then extends its elegant neck and lets out a majestic, ear-splitting squawk.

The stunning bird’s winter home is the George C. Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary, a 850-acre wetland on the Fraser River, approximately 40 minutes from downtown Vancouver in Delta.  The sanctuary is one of a network of parks and habitats along the Fraser Delta that make the area a top destination for bird watchers.

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For the Birds: World-class bird watching on Vancouver’s doorstep

Hidden Gem Alert! Amazing Wildlife at Reifel Bird Sanctuary

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pervspics/4925777756/

Every visitor to Vancouver has their must-do list.  Stanley Park is always on there.  Then there’s Capilano Suspension Bridge and Grouse Mountain and Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden, among other great choices.

Almost no one has the George C. Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary on their list.  But they should.

A stunning reserve situated on 850 acres of coastal ponds and tidal marshes in nearby Delta, B.C., the Reifel Sanctuary is one of the most important stopovers for birds migrating along the Pacific Coast.  Translation:  Year-round, it’s chock-full of amazing wildlife, from majestic great blue herons to waist-high sandhill cranes, snow geese, owls and just about every kind of duck you could imagine.

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Hidden Gem Alert! Amazing Wildlife at Reifel Bird Sanctuary

Bald Eagles in Vancouver & Streaming B.C. Eagle Cams

Bald Eagles in Vancouver. Photo: Hancock Wildlife Foundation

B.C.’s bald eagles have been getting a lot of press lately, given that late-March – mid-April is prime hatching season for their precious eggs. Right now, there are several bald eagle nests—with eggs getting ready to hatch in the next few weeks—scattered throughout the Lower Mainland, including nests in White Rock, Delta, Victoria, Port Moody, and even right here in Vancouver itself.

Thanks to the efforts of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation, bald eagle fans can watch nests–and the eagles and hatchlings–via streaming video.

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Bald Eagles in Vancouver & Streaming B.C. Eagle Cams

Bald Eagles Come to Vancouver

They may not have chosen the prettiest spot . . . but the bald eagles have landed in Vancouver.   Up to a thousand of the iconic raptors have congregated near the Vancouver Landfill, in the suburb of Delta, according to a recent article in the Vancouver Sun.

The eagles have staked out the less-than-picturesque turf because of below normal salmon runs on the rivers where they normally feed.  So rather than flocking to their usual spots – along rivers in Brackendale or Squamish, for instance – they chose the dump.   Since late December, the majestic birds have been battling it out with seagulls for tasty morsels.

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Bald Eagles Come to Vancouver