Waterfall Encounters – Kayaking to Granite Falls

Silver Falls – Indian Arm – Photo: Rob Weiss

Drawn by the sound of cascading water I could feel my heart beat quicken as I paddled harder through the early morning fog. For as long as I can remember, I have been fascinated by waterfalls. Mesmerizing and inspirational, I often feel humbled by their beauty. A symbol of nature’s power, waterfalls captivate us and stimulate our senses.  Fortunately, you do not need to venture far from Vancouver for a high quality, waterfall encounter.

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Waterfall Encounters – Kayaking to Granite Falls

A Kayak Adventure in Vancouver’s Deep Cove

Photo credit: ThePerkyCarrot | Flickr

As much as Vancouver has to offer on land – from world-class cuisine to stunning parks – one of the best ways to experience the city is on the water.  Downtown is almost completely surrounded by inlets and bays, while sounds, fjords and estuaries riddle the nearby coastline.

And one of the easiest ways to get out on the water is in a kayak.  Relatively cheap to rent and easy to use, with little or no experience required, kayaks are nimble enough to maneuver along the shoreline and offer a unique perspective on Canada’s city by the sea.

False Creek, Jericho Beach and English Bay are popular spots, but there’s plenty of great kayaking for beginners and experts alike up and down the coast.  And the creme de la creme for kayaking – offering calm waters and a spectacular backdrop – might just be Deep Cove, a suburb set along a 25-kilometre fjord that extends from the Burrard Inlet.

I drove out to Deep Cove to experience it for myself over the weekend.  Continue reading:
A Kayak Adventure in Vancouver’s Deep Cove

Our Wild Backyard: 4 Daytrips for Nature Lovers

http://www.flickr.com/photos/karlwoll/2828404544/

Dwarfed by the nearby Coast Mountains and surrounded by the wild Pacific Ocean, Vancouver is the rare city readymade for nature lovers.  Within an hour’s drive of the downtown core, endless adventures await on land and sea.  Here are four daytrip ideas for people eager to get back to nature:

  • Paddle Indian Arm: A 12-mile glacial fjord carved through steep mountains, Indian Arm is just a 40-minute drive from downtown Vancouver.  From the community of Deep Cove, you can rent kayaks or strike out on hiking trails.

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Our Wild Backyard: 4 Daytrips for Nature Lovers

Lunch Cruising on Indian Arm, Vancouver’s Glacial Fjord

Indian Arm from Bedwell Bay, BC

Among Vancouver’s greatest charms is its proximity to real wilderness.  Within minutes of leaving downtown, you can be trekking through undeveloped West Coast rainforest, exploring the snow-capped flanks of 5,000-foot Coast Mountain peaks or – one of the most interesting options – cruising up one of North America’s most southerly fjords, Vancouver’s stunning Indian Arm.

Carved by glaciers during the last ice age, Indian Arm extends some 12 miles from the Pacific’s Burrard Inlet, slicing through heavily forested mountain slopes that descend steeply down to the water.  Avid adventurers can opt to explore Indian Arm by canoe or kayak, but for casual daytrippers one of the most pleasant options is an afternoon lunch cruise.

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Lunch Cruising on Indian Arm, Vancouver’s Glacial Fjord

Cruising Indian Arm: Vancouver’s Backyard Wilderness

A lot of things make Vancouver special:  great beaches, Stanley Park and its incredible seawall, plentiful White Spots, etc.   But for me what truly sets the city apart is its backyard – the ocean and jagged mountains  that literally ring the downtown core.  And among the most spectacular of Vancouver’s natural wonders is Indian Arm, a secluded ocean inlet only minutes outside the city.

Carved during the last ice age by glaciers, Indian Arm is a 20-kilometer-long fjord that extends from the Burrard Inlet deep into the heart of the Coast Mountains.  Apart from the small community of Deep Cove, there are no towns along its length.  A few hardy (and wealthy) homesteaders have built weekend lodges on the banks, but the lack of paved roads and Indian Arm’s protected status have kept development at bay.

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Cruising Indian Arm: Vancouver’s Backyard Wilderness