Screening this Wednesday, Amber Tamblyn’s Paint It Black has a Vancouver connection

Alia Shawkat (Arrested Development) stars in Paint it Black, the directorial debut from Amber Tamblyn.

Paint It Black, the directorial debut from Amber Tamblyn, makes its Canadian premiere this Wednesday (June 7) in Vancouver, at the Rio Theatre. Vancouver’s an apt choice for the premiere, since the movie has a local connection – one scene includes a performance by members of Vancouver punk rock band White Lung (since one of the members couldn’t make the shoot the musicians are listed individually in the credits).

Set in Los Angeles, Paint It Black is based on the novel of the same name by Janet Fitch (White Oleander). In its review, the Hollywood Reporter says that the movie “probes the experience of grief in a subjective, intuitive manner, and it achieves remarkable intensity in exploring this theme. The narrative dislocations convey the disorientation that can trail a sudden, senseless death… Tamblyn demonstrates impressive command of the camera in her feature debut. Mac McCaughan’s haunting, dissonant score enhances the film’s impact.”

We talked to Tamblyn, an actor, former child star and published poet (Dark Sparkler is her most recent collection), about her film. Following the screening at the Rio, the director will also take part in a Skype Q-and-A, moderated by Neil LaBute.

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Screening this Wednesday, Amber Tamblyn’s Paint It Black has a Vancouver connection

The messier side of life in Vancouver and more in B.C. film series

Double_Happiness

A scene from Mina Shum’s Double Happiness.

Looking for a way to spend a Monday night in Vancouver? The series The Image Before Us: A History of Film in British Columbia continues with screenings at Cinematheque (1131 Howe in downtown Vancouver) on March 30, April 13 and April 20.

The films include a look at the messier side of life in Vancouver, a documentary about the worst terrorist incident in Canadian history and one of the most talked-about Canadian films of the 1990s.

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The messier side of life in Vancouver and more in B.C. film series