Canada’s Aboriginal People Welcome Olympic Fans . . . and Fill their Bellies

Canada's Aboriginal people, official hosts of the 2010 Games, are welcoming the world with song, dance and some innovative native cuisine.

The 2010 Vancouver Games mark the first Olympics ever in which Aboriginal communities have participated as full partners.  The Games are being held on the traditional lands of the Lil’wat, Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh peoples, collectively known as the Four Host First Nations.   And at the Aboriginal pavilion downtown, a massive longhouse crowned with a 65-foot-high dome, they have been busy welcoming the world.  Demonstrations of traditional arts and dancing offer a window on Aboriginal life.  But – as is so often the case – one of the best ways for visitors to get acquainted with the new culture is through the food.

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Canada’s Aboriginal People Welcome Olympic Fans . . . and Fill their Bellies

All aboard the Canada Line to welcome the world

The world waits to board the Canada Line at Waterfront Station...

Tourism Vancouver expects as many as 350,000 visitors to pour into the city for the Olympics and judging by the recent rush-hour line-ups for the Canada Line, they’re already here.

I was an obedient Canadian and followed TransLink‘s recommendations to park the car and “travel smart” during the 2010 Winter Games, so I’ve been riding a lot of public transit since the start of the month.

I’m using ’em all: SeaBus, SkyTrain, streetcar, bus. But for a diehard people-watcher like me, the Canada Line (from Waterfront Station to YVR and suburban Richmond) is my favourite way to travel through the city.

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All aboard the Canada Line to welcome the world