Lululemon Pants Still Too Sheer? Here’s the Fix

Photo credit: lululemon athletica | Flickr

Photo credit: lululemon athletica | Flickr

Last March, Vancouver-based athletic-wear maker Lululemon made headlines after consumers discovered that some of its popular women’s yoga pants were “see-through.”  Because of a manufacturing defect, ladies who bent and stretched in their signature Luon pants were often unknowingly leaving themselves exposed.

Now, after several lawsuits, a new manufacturing process and some deep soul searching, Lululemon is offering an additional – and maybe more realistic – explanation for the snafu: You’re trying to squeeze into pants that are way too small for you.

In response to complaints that some of its yoga pants are still see-through, Lululemon has warned patrons that they may simply be buying sizes that are too petite.  On its website, the retailer encouragers customers to do “an in-store fit session with one of our educators to make sure the fit is right . . . .”

The overwhelming conclusion of these fit sessions, according to a great article by the Vancouver Sun’s Aleesha Harris: Size up. Continue reading:
Lululemon Pants Still Too Sheer? Here’s the Fix

Lululemon Recalls Yoga Pants That Reveal Too Much

Photo credit: lululemon athletica | Flickr

Photo credit: lululemon athletica | Flickr

Watch out, yoga-loving ladies of Vancouver.  That downward dog may be stretching more than your quads.

Yoga-wear maker Lululemon announced earlier this week that some of its most popular black yoga pants become sheer – i.e. see-through – when stretched.  Apparently, a slight manufacturing defect went unnoticed, and now tens of thousands of buyers are walking around in trendy, breathable and sometimes transparent stretch pants.

“We want you to Down Dog and Crow with confidence and we felt these pants didn’t measure up,” explained a company blog post.

Affected are Lululemon’s popular black Luon pants ($98), which represent 17 percent of its line.  The revealing active wear will be recalled from Lulu’s 200 stores, and consumers who bought the pants after March 1 can return them for a refund or exchange.

The problem was impossible to detect in factories, explained Lululemon CEO Christine Day in an interview with Bloomberg. “The truth of the matter is the only way you can actually test for the issue is to put the pants on and bend over . . . . [It] wasn’t until we got in the store and started putting it on people that we could actually see the issue.”

While the news caused a slight dip in Lululemon’s stock prices, the snafu has been great for publicity.  News programs and websites around the world have picked up on the story, shining the spotlight on the Vancouver-based company.  Some commentators even praised Lulu’s sheer Luon pants as the leading edge of a trend emphasizing skin tight materials and risque design in women’s athletic fashion.

And, of course, Twitter had a field day with the recall.   A few gems, as compiled by the Vancouver SunContinue reading:
Lululemon Recalls Yoga Pants That Reveal Too Much