A Bird’s-Eye View of Vancouver’s Forests: Canopy Tours

greenheart canopy

The West Coast temperate rain forests around Vancouver are filled with towering Douglas Firs, western hemlocks and red cedars.  Surviving old growth trees, some nearly a thousand years old, rise hundreds of feet into the mountain air.  For travelers, one of the most unique – and hair-raising – ways to experience these forests is from above.

Canopy walkways – platforms and swinging bridges hung high in the forest – offer visitors a bird’s-eye view of Vancouver’s natural splendor.  Constructed out of steel cables, the wobbly walkways run from tree trunk to tree trunk, in some cases hanging 100 feet above the forest floor.  At those heights, you’re eye to eye with chattering squirrels and nesting birds and immersed in the majestic green canvas of the rain forest.

There are two options in the city for adventurers interested in exploring the canopy.  Both are completely safe, with safety rails and security netting, but nonetheless aren’t for the faint of heart.

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A Bird’s-Eye View of Vancouver’s Forests: Canopy Tours

Capilano Suspension Bridge: Reconsidered

Photo: Remy Scalza

Talk to travelers who have visited Vancouver recently and chances are good they’ve been to Capilano Suspension Bridge, the iconic 100-year-old landmark on the city’s North Shore.   The bridge, swaying 230 feet above the Capilano River, is Vancouver’s tourist attraction par excellence – rooted in nature, rich in history, interactive and just a little bit scary.  700,000 people visited last year, making it one of the most popular attractions in the entire country.

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Capilano Suspension Bridge: Reconsidered