Bill Reid Gallery: Resurgence – Indigiqueer Identities

Two Spirits at the Carnival Stations of the Cross. By Levi Nelson, Oil, acrylic on canvas, 2019. Private collection.

The Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art presents the exhibition Resurgence: Indigiqueer Identities, curated by Jordana Luggi – which celebrates the deeply personal and profound work of four emerging artists – and their unique identities and stories as queer Indigenous people, on display October 21, 2020 – January 24, 2021. Continue reading:
Bill Reid Gallery: Resurgence – Indigiqueer Identities

Things to Do in Vancouver This Weekend

For yourself or for the fathers in your life, there is a lot of fun to be had this weekend. The Queer Arts Festival opens, there’s free family events at the Bill Reid Gallery, symphony, comedy, football, drag, burlesque, a car show, and behind-the-scenes tours of the Commodore Ballroom.

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Things to Do in Vancouver This Weekend

Six great places to buy Aboriginal Art and Clothes

The Bill Reid Gallery Gift Shop features art and clothing made by Northwest BC First Nations people.

The Bill Reid Gallery Gift Shop features art and clothing made by Northwest Coast Aboriginal people.

Aboriginal culture is the foundation of Vancouver’s identity. Our city is located on the ancestral lands of the Coast Salish people and this is evident throughout our streets, parks and shops.

Whether you love the totem poles in Stanley Park, the Aboriginal art murals found all over the city or places with First Nation names like Capilano Suspension Bridge or Whey-Ah-Whichen or Siwash Rock, there is no mistaking local First Nations role in shaping Vancouver’s multicultural mosaic.

How better to share this vital part of our city’s cultural character with friends and family, than buying a piece of art, clothing or other gift made and/or designed by an Aboriginal person from Vancouver or B.C.?

A few years ago, Inside Vancouver featured a collection of must-visit Aboriginal art galleries and shops. This updated list is meant to complement the previous collection and highlight some of the new and seasoned places to ‘Shop Aboriginal’.  Continue reading:
Six great places to buy Aboriginal Art and Clothes

Haida Hip Hop Art Exhibit Opening in Vancouver

Photo sourced from Native Northwest

Photo sourced from Native Northwest

Chances are you’ve never seen First Nations art quite like this.

The monumental works of Haida spray-can artist Corey Bulpitt are coming to downtown Vancouver’s Bill Reid Gallery.  The Akos exhibition, which opens June 5, shows the natural fusion between hip hop culture (in particular, street art and graffiti) and traditional Haida culture.

Bulpitt is a member of the Naikun River clan of the Haida nation, but he grew up in the Vancouver area.  After graduating from the Langley Fine Arts School, he returned to Haida Gwaii in northwestern B.C. to apprentice with traditional carvers.  Bulpitt’s masterful carvings – including a 20-foot cedar totem poll for Scouts Canada – can be seen across the province.

But it’s his affiliation with the Beat Nation movement – an artist community that seeks to merge hip hop and Aboriginal culture – that has brought him the most attention.   Continue reading:
Haida Hip Hop Art Exhibit Opening in Vancouver

First Nations Erotica Exhibit Comes to Vancouver

Preston Singletary: Geoduck, 2012.  Courtesy of Preseton Singletary Inc. Photo: Russell Johnson

Preston Singletary: Geoduck, 2012.
Courtesy of Preseton Singletary Inc. Photo: Russell Johnson

Chances are you’ve never seen First Nations art quite like this.

Just opened at Vancouver’s Bill Reid Gallery, RezErect focuses on the world of native erotica.  The cheekily named exhibition highlights sexually charged works from 27 First Nations artists, from phallic-shaped geoduck (giant saltwater clam) sculptures to bentwood boxes meant to connote the female anatomy.

“Sex figures prominently in aboriginal stories across the continent, as sexual humour, playful irreverence, spiritual reverence, place names, morality tales or other meanings lost in time,” writes co-curator and Haida artist Gwaii Edenshaw.  “We hope to carry on that tradition here – sexy, intelligent, provocative and fun.”

The exhibition, which is intended for adults and youth 16 years and older, will no doubt raise some eyebrows.   Continue reading:
First Nations Erotica Exhibit Comes to Vancouver

Seeking out the art of Haida Gwaii in Vancouver

Bill Reid: The Raven and the First Men, 1990 22k gold Photo credit:  Kenji Nagai

Bill Reid: The Raven and the First Men, 1990 22k gold Photo credit: Kenji Nagai

Have you ever fell so head over gumboots for a place that you want to keep returning? I feel that way about Vancouver, but recently I’ve also fallen for another rainy, tree and beach-fringed destination: Haida Gwaii.

Haida Gwaii is a brilliant, evergreen archipelago located in Northern British Columbia over 170 kilometres west of Prince Rupert. For the last two summers I’ve made the journey to Haida Gwaii to explore endless beaches, feast on seafood and poke around numerous art galleries and studios.

This summer there will be no such journey across Hecate Strait, however I have developed some coping mechanisms. To help navigate the waves of Haida Gwaii nostalgia, I’ve turned to scoping out the art of Haida Gwaii in Vancouver. Below you’ll find a list of spots I frequent when I’m missing the misty isles.
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Seeking out the art of Haida Gwaii in Vancouver

Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe Exhibit – Held Over until March 24

Bill Reid's Black Eagle Canoe. Photo Credit: Harry Foster

Haven’t had a chance yet to check out the Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe Exhibit at downtown’s Bill Reid Gallery?  You’re in luck.  The landmark exhibition – exploring the dramatic role of the canoe in Northwest Coast art and culture – is being extended through March 24.

So what’s so important about the canoe?  In the word’s of Bill Reid himself, the artist who nearly single-handedly triggered a renaissance in first nations art in Canada: “Western art starts with the figure – West Coast Indian art starts with the canoe.”  In other words, the canoe is much more than just a means of transportation: It’s a work of art that embodies an entire culture.

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Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe Exhibit – Held Over until March 24