Pint Controversy Spills Over in Vancouver

Photo credit: Tim Dobson | Wikimedia Commons

Photo credit: Tim Dobson | Wikimedia Commons

Are you getting enough beer for your buck?

Maybe not, according to a sobering new investigative report in the Vancouver Sun. Reporters scoured the city’s bars and discovered that some are shortchanging their patrons on pints.

By law, a pint of beer must be 20 ounces.  However, some establishments are serving up “pints” that are anywhere from 18 ounces to 14 ounces.  The total loss to thirsty beer drinkers is estimated to be equivalent to two Olympic-sized swimming pools or, in monetary terms, $50 million.

Discovering the under-pours required some creative sleuthing (video here) by newspaper staff. Reporter Larry Pynn ordered pints in dozens of bars and secretly measured the volume, pouring the beer out of the glass and making use of special measuring containers.

Many of the worst offenders are listed on the Vancouver Sun website.  In fairness, however, many bars did serve full, honest-to-goodness pints, including the Alibi Room on Alexander Street, Rogue in Waterfront Station, the Whip just off Main Street and Library Square on West Georgia.

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Pint Controversy Spills Over in Vancouver

“Local” Food Controversy Consumes Vancouver

Photo credit: PilotGirl | Flickr

Photo credit: PilotGirl | Flickr

Would you consider blueberries from Bellingham to be local? How about tomatoes from Jasper?

New definitions from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency have dramatically stretched what it means to eat local, according to an article in the Vancouver Sun.   The updated guidelines says that any food produced in B.C. or within 50 kilometres of its borders is considered local.

In a province as large as B.C., this means that “local” produce and meat could be coming from thousands of kilometres away or even from other countries.

Vancouver eaters are already taking issue with the confusing change in terminology, which may alter the way products are labeled in grocery stores and on restaurant menus.

In the past, local food was defined by CFIA simply as anything produced within a 50-kilometre radius of where it was sold.  This offered buyers assurances that their fruits, veggies, meats and cheeses were all grown or made in their own backyard and not shipped long distances.

But that restrictive definition also created problems of its own. Continue reading:
“Local” Food Controversy Consumes Vancouver

Pee-Gate 2011: Vancouver washroom sign makes global headlines

Well, for at least the second time in a month, Vancouver is making the rounds on the international blogosphere.  And it’s not exactly the most flattering commentary (but it is funny).

First came our distinction as third-worst-dressed city in the world.   Now, bloggers are up in arms about a sign posted in the co-ed bathroom of a Granville Island restaurant.  The sign consists of a male figure peeing, with a line through it.   In other words: No peeing standing up.

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Pee-Gate 2011: Vancouver washroom sign makes global headlines