7 Ways to Get Outdoors in Delta

Viewing platform at Deas Island Regional Park

Wildlife viewing platform at Deas Island Regional Park. Photo: Metro Vancouver Regional Parks

Surrounded by the Fraser River and the Pacific Ocean, Delta has lots of great places to experience the outdoors. Ride your bike, take a nature walk, go bird watching, and lots more.

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7 Ways to Get Outdoors in Delta

February’s Vancouver Hike of the Month: Deas Island

Two people walk along the river in Deas Island Regional Park near Vancouver

Exploring the shoreline near the south end of Deas Island. Photo: Taryn Eyton

Did you know you can hike right over the George Massey Tunnel? The short and easy trail around Delta’s Deas Island Regional Park at the tunnel’s south end is a great hike for February. It’s right at sea-level, so it avoids the snow and is a great walk, even in wet weather. With fewer leaves on the trees, it’s also a wonderful place spot many types of birds, including eagles.

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February’s Vancouver Hike of the Month: Deas Island

Vancouver’s Polar Bear Swim Turns 100! Plus 4 Other Places to Polar Bear Swim in Metro Vancouver

Vancouver Polar Bear Swim

Vancouver Polar Bear Swim. Photo credit: Sherwood411 on Flickr

If you’ve never jumped into the ocean on New Year’s Day before, next year might be the time to start. Vancouver’s legendary Polar Bear Swim celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2020! Plus, there are four other Vancouver-area Polar Bear Swims happening on New Year’s Day.

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Vancouver’s Polar Bear Swim Turns 100! Plus 4 Other Places to Polar Bear Swim in Metro Vancouver

BC Superweek: Watch Pro Cycling in Vancouver

Racers at the 2017 Gastown Grand Prix. Photo via GlobalRelayGGP.org

If you want to catch some of North America’s best cyclists in action, check out BC Superweek. From July 5-14 the Vancouver area hosts nine different pro cycling races in six different communities. Each race has a slightly different format, but they all take place on local streets so they’re free to watch. The racing gets pretty exciting as the athletes can hit speeds of up to 70kph! Plus, many of the races have fun extras like kids events, live music, or beer gardens.

There are two main types of races in the series. A criterium is a race where riders do laps around the same short circuit, jockeying for position. There is a lot of sprinting. (Tip: If you want to sound like a pro, call it a “crit”.) The road race is more of an endurance event where the cyclists race a longer course. Both are pretty fun to watch. Here’s a full listing of all the races you can check out.

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BC Superweek: Watch Pro Cycling in Vancouver

Want to sing like Pavarotti? Opera Classes Coming to Vancouver-Area High School

A Vancouver Opera production of Verdi's Aida from 2012

A Vancouver Opera production of Verdi’s Aida from 2012

Earlier this year, it was announced that computer coding would be integrated into the curriculum at schools across British Columbia. But one Vancouver-area district is now offering its students a decidedly more old-school option.

Starting next fall, grade 8-12 students in the Delta School District will be able to enrol in opera classes. They’ll have a unique chance to study alongside professionals from the Vancouver Opera, belting out the classics in Italian, French and German.

The program represents a first-of-its-kind partnership in Canada between an internationally known opera company and a public high school, according to the Vancouver Sun. Students will have the chance to learn not just voice but also acting and script- and score-writing, studying with the same pros who grace the Vancouver Opera stages.  Continue reading:
Want to sing like Pavarotti? Opera Classes Coming to Vancouver-Area High School

Snowy Owls Return to Vancouver

Photo Credit: Remy Scalza | Flickr

The snowy owls are back.

The cuddly looking birds with white feathers and giant yellow eyes have again taken up residence in Delta, outside of Vancouver, according to an article in the Vancouver Sun.  More than two dozen of the enormous owls, which stand up to 61 centimetres and have a wingspan of 1.5 metres, are currently living in Boundary Bay Regional Park.

For wildlife lovers, it’s a rare treat.  While the owls also appeared last year, they are far from a common sight in the area.  They spend their summers on the arctic tundra, growing fat on lemmings hunted on the open plains.  When cold weather hits, they migrate south, occasionally ending up in the Lower Mainland.

Thousands of birdwatchers flocked to Delta and Tsawwassen to see the snowy owls last year.  On some days, the dykes along the bay were nearly wall-to-wall tripods, as eager photographers lined up for shots.

Wildlife experts warn, however, that too much disturbance could be lethal for the animals, which are already weakened from the long flight and a lack of food over the summer.  People wanting a peek at the owls are urged to keep a respectful distance and use binoculars and scopes.  Agitating the birds or causing them to take flight could deplete their already limited energy reserves and actually kill the animals.   Continue reading:
Snowy Owls Return to Vancouver

Bald Eagles Come to Vancouver

They may not have chosen the prettiest spot . . . but the bald eagles have landed in Vancouver.   Up to a thousand of the iconic raptors have congregated near the Vancouver Landfill, in the suburb of Delta, according to a recent article in the Vancouver Sun.

The eagles have staked out the less-than-picturesque turf because of below normal salmon runs on the rivers where they normally feed.  So rather than flocking to their usual spots – along rivers in Brackendale or Squamish, for instance – they chose the dump.   Since late December, the majestic birds have been battling it out with seagulls for tasty morsels.

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Bald Eagles Come to Vancouver