3 Places for a Snowshoe-Fondue Outing in Vancouver

Image sourced from HelloBC

Image sourced from HelloBC

The fresh powder is glistening with moonlight; snowshoes swooshing through new-fallen snow is the only sound. Led by a guide, you work your way through forests of towering hemlock and Douglas fir trees, while the city lights of Vancouver twinkle in the distance, thousands of feet below. Up ahead, a light shines inside a rustic cabin and a you might even catch a hint of chocolate in the mountain air.

Welcome to Vancouver’s unique snowshoe and fondue adventures. All three local mountains offer the chance to explore the alpine scenery after dusk, then warm up in lodges with steaming hot cider and authentic fondue. Continue reading:
3 Places for a Snowshoe-Fondue Outing in Vancouver

Vancouver Hidden Gem: Quarry Rock Hiking, Minus the Crowds

Seymour_Maplewood-74Ask local hikers for their favourite short hike – the quick jaunt to a scenic viewpoint that rewards every time – and one name comes up a lot: the Quarry Rock Trail.  Located just outside Deep Cove, Quarry Rock (also known as Deep Cove Lookout) towers high above the Indian Arm inlet and is accessed by a 3.8-kilometre roundtrip trail from town.

But with popularity comes problems.  Finding parking along the trailhead at Panorama Drive can be a nightmare. Plus, on busy weekends, the trail can feel like a traffic jam, with big groups of hikers and international tour groups tromping up and down.

But there is a solution: a way to enjoy the great views at Quarry Rock while avoiding the hassles of the Quarry Rock Trail.

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Vancouver Hidden Gem: Quarry Rock Hiking, Minus the Crowds

Can $6-Million Plan Save Stanley Park’s Beaver Lake?

Photo credit: Bobanny | Wikipedia

Photo credit: Bobanny | Wikipedia

Stanley Park has lots must-see sites, from the seawall to the Vancouver Aquarium and the incredible vistas from Prospect Point.  But for many regulars, the park’s most enchanting spot is a humble little pond far from the crowds and the cameras.

Beaver Lake, which really does have resident beavers, is tucked away in a thickly forested zone accessed via walking and biking trails.  And now the tiny lake – which is filling up with silt and shrinking every year – has a new lease of life.

The Vancouver park board has just approved a new $2-$6 million plan to save Beaver Lake.  The ambitious rescue package calls for extensive dredging of the lake to get rid of all that silt, plus the construction of new boardwalks and viewing platforms for visitors, according to an article in the Vancouver Sun.

While the price tag may seem high, the alternative was losing the lake completely.   Continue reading:
Can $6-Million Plan Save Stanley Park’s Beaver Lake?

Best Way to Beat the Rain in Vancouver? You Make the Call!

Sanafir-Bloedel-Little-India-VanAq-078-CustomWell, we had a good run.  But it looks like the wet stuff is finally here.

After an uncommonly mild spring, exceptional summer and very sunny fall, the clouds and rain have returned to Vancouver.  Sure, we’ll have a few bright, sunny days in the next few months … but don’t count on too many of them.

But that’s no reason to hunker down inside until next spring.  Vancouver is a city that comes alive once the liquid sunshine starts falling. With so many museums, great shopping, cafes and pubs and live entertainment options, there are plenty of ways to wile away an otherwise dreary afternoon out in the city.

In fact, the choices can be overwhelming, which is why I need your help.  What’s your favourite rainy day activity in Vancouver (apart from sitting on the couch watching Netflix)? Do you have a go-to place in the city when the skies are clouded over and the rain is falling? Let us know by leaving a comment below.

I’ll get things started with my top, all-time-favourite rainy day spot in Vancouver, a place where it’s warm and balmy 365 days a year – the Bloedel Conservatory in Queen Elizabeth Park.

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Best Way to Beat the Rain in Vancouver? You Make the Call!

The Vancouver Convention Centre’s Six-Acre Living Roof Gets its Annual Haircut

photo: The VCC's living roof gets a haircut.

photo: The VCC’s living roof gets a haircut

The Vancouver Convention Centre’s six-acre living roof gets a haircut once a year in the fall. The honey produced by the bees living on the roof is also harvested at this time of year. Here are some interesting facts and figures about the annual mowing of the living roof and the VCC’s resident bees.

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The Vancouver Convention Centre’s Six-Acre Living Roof Gets its Annual Haircut