Bike Sharing Still Coming to Vancouver … Maybe

Bay Area Bike Share bicycles. Photo credit: Richard Masoner / Cyclelicious | Wikipedia

Bay Area Bike Share bicycles. Photo credit: Richard Masoner / Cyclelicious | Wikipedia

Shareable bikes may be coming to Vancouver after all.

The city is currently seeking a new partner to launch its long-anticipated bike share scheme. An initial plan, approved in 2013, called for $6 million to be spent to implement a network of 1,500 rental bikes throughout the city. But multiple delays have plagued the initiative.

Most recently, the company that was to provide the city with bikes went bankrupt. Bixi Bikes filed for bankruptcy protection in 2014 and was subsequently bailed out – to the tune of tens of millions of dollars – by the city of Montreal. As a result, Bixi’s partner for the Vancouver launch – a Portland company called Alta Bicycle Share – was unable to get the program rolling in the city.

In the wake of the debacle, Alta has changed its name to Motivate and now manages successful bike-share programs in Toronto, New York and Melbourne. Vancouver, however, is still bike-less – but maybe not for long.   Continue reading:
Bike Sharing Still Coming to Vancouver … Maybe

Ranger Danger: Vancouver’s Grouse Grind Trail Gets 2 Rangers to Help Hikers

Photo credit: Michael Brown | Flickr

Photo credit: Michael Brown | Flickr

Vancouver’s Grouse Grind will be a little bit safer this summer.

The famously gruelling route to the top of Grouse Mountain –  which climbs 2,830 stairs over the course of 2.9 kilometres – now has a pair of dedicated park rangers. For the 2015 hiking season, which commenced May 8, Metro Vancouver has hired the rangers to patrol the trails and assist hikers.

The rangers are currently on the job, though they’re still waiting for official uniforms, according to a CBC article. Their primary role is to ensure that hikers are prepared for the challenging ascent, properly hydrated and wearing adequate footwear. In addition they’ll be able to assess injuries on the trail and liaise with firefighters and North Shore Rescue when more assistance is needed.

But the new rangers won’t be policing the route or enforcing by-laws.

Each year more than 150,000 people tackle the Grouse Grind, which ascends through 853 metres of Pacific coastal rainforest and has earned the nickname Mother Nature’s Stairmaster. Continue reading:
Ranger Danger: Vancouver’s Grouse Grind Trail Gets 2 Rangers to Help Hikers

Trash Talk Documentary

trash

What happens to our trash after we throw it away? In this doc, the film makers behind SHIFT take a closer look at what Vancouver’s new organics ban means when it comes to our garbage and meet three local companies doing incredible things with our waste. They also track and store our garbage for 30 days to see what our waste footprint really looks like.

Green Milestone in Vancouver: Half of all trips now by bike, transit or on foot

Photo credit: Paul Krueger | Flickr

Photo credit: Paul Krueger | Flickr

Vancouver is officially a little greener this month. New stats released by city transportation officials show that, for the first time ever, nearly just as many trips are made by bike, transit or on foot as are made by car.

In 2014, a total of 918,000 daily trips were made by automobile, down from 983,000 the year before. That compares to 905,000 daily trips made by bike, transit or on foot in 2014, up from 893,000 the year before.

In other words, cars now only account for roughly half of all trips made in Vancouver – a major milestone in the city’s quest to become the world’s “greenest” city by 2020. At the same time, total kilometres travelled by vehicle has plummeted in recent years, down 21 percent since 2007.

Much of that progress can be attributed to a dramatic uptick in cycling. Continue reading:
Green Milestone in Vancouver: Half of all trips now by bike, transit or on foot

Crabbing 101: New Vancouver Tour Shows How to Catch and Cook Crab

Photo credit: Joanne Wan | Flickr

Photo credit: Joanne Wan | Flickr

The king of crabs – at least around Vancouver – goes by the scientific name metacarcinus magister. Better known as the Dungeness crab, this tasty crustacean can grow up to 20 centimetres across its shell and is known for its sweet, tender meat.  Locally, Dungeness crab turns up in everything from crab cakes and fancy Eggs Benedict to California rolls packed with the succulent meat.

Now, a brand new tour is offering local crab lovers a chance to catch and cook a Dungeness crab of their own. Offered by Swallow Tail – the Vancouver company known for its wild foraging tours – the Catch and Cook Crabbing Tour takes aspiring crabbers to the docks at a local hotspot to try their luck.  The goal: catch your own dinner and learn how to cook it up like the pros.  Continue reading:
Crabbing 101: New Vancouver Tour Shows How to Catch and Cook Crab