Trash Talk Documentary

trash

What happens to our trash after we throw it away? In this doc, the film makers behind SHIFT take a closer look at what Vancouver’s new organics ban means when it comes to our garbage and meet three local companies doing incredible things with our waste. They also track and store our garbage for 30 days to see what our waste footprint really looks like.

Green Milestone in Vancouver: Half of all trips now by bike, transit or on foot

Photo credit: Paul Krueger | Flickr

Photo credit: Paul Krueger | Flickr

Vancouver is officially a little greener this month. New stats released by city transportation officials show that, for the first time ever, nearly just as many trips are made by bike, transit or on foot as are made by car.

In 2014, a total of 918,000 daily trips were made by automobile, down from 983,000 the year before. That compares to 905,000 daily trips made by bike, transit or on foot in 2014, up from 893,000 the year before.

In other words, cars now only account for roughly half of all trips made in Vancouver – a major milestone in the city’s quest to become the world’s “greenest” city by 2020. At the same time, total kilometres travelled by vehicle has plummeted in recent years, down 21 percent since 2007.

Much of that progress can be attributed to a dramatic uptick in cycling. Continue reading:
Green Milestone in Vancouver: Half of all trips now by bike, transit or on foot

Crabbing 101: New Vancouver Tour Shows How to Catch and Cook Crab

Photo credit: Joanne Wan | Flickr

Photo credit: Joanne Wan | Flickr

The king of crabs – at least around Vancouver – goes by the scientific name metacarcinus magister. Better known as the Dungeness crab, this tasty crustacean can grow up to 20 centimetres across its shell and is known for its sweet, tender meat.  Locally, Dungeness crab turns up in everything from crab cakes and fancy Eggs Benedict to California rolls packed with the succulent meat.

Now, a brand new tour is offering local crab lovers a chance to catch and cook a Dungeness crab of their own. Offered by Swallow Tail – the Vancouver company known for its wild foraging tours – the Catch and Cook Crabbing Tour takes aspiring crabbers to the docks at a local hotspot to try their luck.  The goal: catch your own dinner and learn how to cook it up like the pros.  Continue reading:
Crabbing 101: New Vancouver Tour Shows How to Catch and Cook Crab

Falcon, Owl, Grebe or Swallow? Vote Now for the 2015 City Bird of Vancouver

Photo credit: Magnus Manske | Wikimedia Commons

Photo credit: Magnus Manske | Wikimedia Commons

It’s time to cast your vote for the City Bird of Vancouver – just don’t expect to see too many of the candidates flying around downtown.

The theme for this year’s “bird election” is rare birds. The Vancouver Bird Advisory Committee selected the four finalists in order to raise awareness about endangered species that were once common in and around the city.  Contenders this year are the barn owl, peregrine falcon, barn swallow and western grebe (a waterfowl).

You can vote online at the City of Vancouver website through May 9.  As of the time of writing, the grebe was pulling away as an early favourite with 4,757 votes, followed by the barn owl with 3,817 votes.  Each candidate also has a dedicated Twitter account to drum up support. You can follow along at @heyitsbarnowl, @thebarnswallow, @vanperegrine and @westerngrebe.  (Best Twitter bio goes to the barn owl: “An old soul. Fan of free-range organic food, urban agriculture, heritage buildings, espresso.”) Continue reading:
Falcon, Owl, Grebe or Swallow? Vote Now for the 2015 City Bird of Vancouver

See a Live Webcam of Vancouver’s Great Blue Heron Colony

Photo credit: Alan D. Wilson | Wikipedia

Photo credit: Alan D. Wilson | Wikipedia

A new webcam is giving wildlife lovers an intimate, interactive look at Vancouver’s colony of great blue herons.

Mounted on the roof of a nearby apartment building, the Vancouver Park Board Heron Cam focuses in on a cluster of nests built high in the trees next to the tennis courts in Stanley Park.  Dozens of the long-legged birds with bright blue feathers can be seen sitting on nests, perching on branches and even tending to newly laid eggs.

In a unique twists, the webcam is also interactive.  By visiting the official website (http://vancouver.ca/parks-recreation-culture/heron-cam.aspx), viewers can join a queue to control what the camera looks at. It’s possible to zoom in tight on individual nests or select wider angle views to see the whole scene.

Each spring, hundreds of great blue herons, which are classified as a “special concern” species in Canada, return to Vancouver’s Stanley Park as part of their annual migration pattern. Continue reading:
See a Live Webcam of Vancouver’s Great Blue Heron Colony