Social Media Press Trip in Vancouver

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Last week, four internationally recognized bloggers and photographers travelled to Canada as guests of the Canadian Tourism Commission, Destination BC and Tourism Vancouver. During their stay – which included a visit to the Pemberton Music Festival and once-in-a-lifetime helicopter ride back to Vancouver – they hit the city streets and shared their Vancouver explorations with a combined hundreds of thousands of Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr and Facebook followers.

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Social Media Press Trip in Vancouver

Giant New Public Art Unveiled on Vancouver’s False Creek

Photo sourced from @Van_Biennale's Twitter feed via @Blah_City

Photo sourced from @Van_Biennale’s Twitter feed via @Blah_City

Olympic Village in Vancouver has some colourful new residents.

A brand new seven-metre-tall outdoor sculpture has been installed on the edge of Olympic Village at Hinge Park.  Called Human Structures, the sculpture consists of 64 brightly coloured metal cutouts in the shape of human figures, stacked one on top of the other.

Created by acclaimed U.S. artist Jonathan Borofsky, Human Structures is part of the 2014 Vancouver Biennale, the every-other-year exhibition that brings dozens of works of monumental art to the streets, parks and beaches of Vancouver.  This edition of the Biennale will see some 20 sculptures installed in Vancouver, with an additional 10 works going up in New Westminster, North Vancouver and Squamish.

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Giant New Public Art Unveiled on Vancouver’s False Creek

New All-Access Tour Goes Inside Vancouver’s Historic Orpheum Theatre

Photo credit: MichaelThoeny | Wikimedia Commons

Photo credit: MichaelThoeny | Wikimedia Commons

You may have seen the big neon sign on Granville Street, but how much do you really know about Vancouver’s historic Orpheum Theatre?

Special walking tours are now giving visitors an inside look at the nearly century-old theatre, which started its life as a vaudeville house.  The 90-minute tours (for the bargain price of $10) shed light on the long, sometimes troubled history of one of Vancouver’s most iconic landmarks.

When it opened its doors in 1927, the Orpheum was the biggest theatre in Canada, built with 3,000 seats at the astronomical cost of $1.25 million.   Continue reading:
New All-Access Tour Goes Inside Vancouver’s Historic Orpheum Theatre

Come to Your Senses: Touch

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The Tea Ceremony at Nitobe Memorial Garden

Explore Vancouver with your senses in Destination BC’s newest video. Here’s how to experience Vancouver’s natural and cultural makeup through touch.

Sensational Vancouver – Book Giveaway

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History books typically show Vancouver as a pioneer city built on forestry, fisheries, and tourism, but behind the snow-capped mountains and rain forests, the Vancouver of the first half of the 20th century was a hotbed of civic corruption. The top job at the Vancouver Police Department was a revolving door with the average tenure for a police chief of just four years.

In those early years, Detective Joe Ricci’s beat was the opium dens and gambling joints of Chinatown, while Lurancy Harris—the first female cop in Canada—patrolled the high-end brothels of Alexander Street. Later, proceeds from rum running produced some of the city’s most iconic buildings, cops became robbers, and the city reeled from a series of unsolved murders.

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Sensational Vancouver – Book Giveaway