‘Oh god, keep this book out of schools’—comedian Evany Rosen launches What I Think Happened

A new imprint from Vancouver publisher Arsenal Pulp Press promises to bring some of Canada’s funniest people to print.

Overseen by local comedian/writer Charles Demers, Robin’s Egg Books will feature “fresh, smart and funny writing on culturally relevant subjects,” according to a media release.

The imprint’s first book, published earlier this month, is What I Think Happened: An Underresearched History of the Western World. Written by Toronto comedian/author Evany Rosen, the book looks at history from a feminist (and funny) perspective.

Rosen will be in town for the book’s official (and free!) Vancouver launch, Nov. 4 at Little Mountain Comedy (195 E 26th Ave., 7 p.m. start). Demers will also be in attendance, along with some special guests.

But just what lies between the covers of What I Think Happened?

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‘Oh god, keep this book out of schools’—comedian Evany Rosen launches What I Think Happened

‘Embedded historian’ Aaron Chapman on his new book, Live at the Commodore

commodore-ballroom

One of Vancouver’s most venerable entertainment institutions now has its own book.

Local author/historian Aaron Chapman has penned Live at the Commodore: The Story of Vancouver’s Historic Commodore Ballroom. The book is a loving ode to the Granville Street venue that has hosted everything from vaudeville to big bands to classic rock to punk, and just about everything in between.

Live at the Commodore Ballroom is in local bookstores now. But you can also attend a launch at the Commodore itself Nov. 26. It will feature readings and live music, and admission is free with ticket or reservation (see below for details). Also featured as part of the evening, The Vancouver Heritage Foundation will present one of its Places that Matter plaques to the Commodore Ballroom recognizing its significance to the city.

We talked to Chapman about the book, which is filled with telling anecdotes and never-before-published photographs, posters and more.

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‘Embedded historian’ Aaron Chapman on his new book, Live at the Commodore

Power, corruption and lies – new book on Vancouver history digs deep

A man and woman walk across the still-relatively-new Lions Gate Bridge, 1939. City of Vancouver Archives. CVA 260-995. Photograph by James Crookall.

A man and woman walk across the still-relatively-new Lions Gate Bridge, 1939. City of Vancouver Archives. CVA 260-995. Photograph by James Crookall.

It’s likely that even most Vancouverites won’t know the facts or even the names behind many of the stories collected in a forthcoming book on the city and its history. Anvil Press’s Vancouver Confidential, to be published Sept. 15, collects essays by a variety of writers on unknown and obscure stories from the fringes of Vancouver.

Police corruption, blinkered courts, a murder/suicide in Chinatown and the case of the Lovers’ Lane Marauder are all here, featured in a book the publisher promises will “honour the chorus line behind the star performer, the mug in the mugshot, the victim in the murder, the teens in the gang and the ‘slum’ in the path of the bulldozer.”

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Power, corruption and lies – new book on Vancouver history digs deep