Central Studios: Vancouver’s Newest Queer-centric Party Venue

By Rachel Rosenberg

August 29th marked the launch of Vancouver’s newest arts and culture venue, Central Studios. Located in the downtown core at 856 Seymour Street, this queer owned and operated business is both a production space and performance venue. The multi-level building includes a 3000sq ft. cabaret, a photography studio, a gallery and spaces for office use and art production. Central Studios wants to hear from queer artists and creators, so find them on Instagram or Facebook.

You know how nothing cool ever happens mid-week, so you want to do something to navigate that lull, boost you over until your weekend properly begins? Wednesdays at Central, according to their event page, will feature Vancouver drag superstars “express[ing] their queer existence through love, music, and theatre”.  Shows will run every hour from 10 PM – 12 AM, featuring artists such as Boss, Maiden China, Shay Dior, Continental Breakfast, Madam Lola and many more. At 1 AM, anyone can drop in and perform a number, so contact Continental Breakfast to reserve a spot.

Images by Amus Beasto Photography

Visit their Facebook page to see the other upcoming parties, such as House and Techno nights like Transmit and cheeky dance nights like Make Out Party. Support the queer community and have fun while doing it.

 

Rachel Rosenberg is a writer and library technician who is a proud member of the LGBTQ2+ community. She writes for Book Riot and can be found on Twitter @LibraryRachelR

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One Response to Central Studios: Vancouver’s Newest Queer-centric Party Venue

  1. given that the individual who runs these events has drugging and sex assault allegations against them numbering in the teens, you might want to reconsider boosting them as a positive queer inclusive event. They are a threat to queer people.