LUSH Gorilla Perfume Presents: Gorilla Gallery Vol IV in Vancouver

With the long-awaited launch of LUSH Gorilla Perfume IV, comes the return of the Gorilla Gallery.

At Gorilla, they’ve always said that Perfume is Art, and have always been passionate about exploring art in all its forms. That’s why every time they release a new collection of perfumes they create an interactive exhibition, where each one becomes its very own installation. Guests are allowed to truly immerse themselves in the scents and experience the stories that inspired them.

Continue reading:
LUSH Gorilla Perfume Presents: Gorilla Gallery Vol IV in Vancouver

Special Exhibit on Franklin’s Lost Expedition Comes to Vancouver Maritime Museum

Images from Parks Canada

Images from Parks Canada

In 1845, Sir John Franklin departed England on a quest to traverse the last uncharted section of the fabled Northwest Passage. His ships became icebound high in the Canadian Arctic and Franklin, with his crew of 128 men, was never heard from again. For more than 150 years, the fate and final resting place of Franklin’s lost expedition was one of the greatest mysteries of Canadian history.

But it’s a mystery no longer – and now Vancouverites can get the inside scoop at a special new exhibition at the Vancouver Maritime Museum, launching March 23.  Continue reading:
Special Exhibit on Franklin’s Lost Expedition Comes to Vancouver Maritime Museum

Hyundai Donation Fuels Opening of New Science World Exhibit: Check it Out for the Next 3 Years!

035

Science World’s newest fun and interactive exhibit is providing visitors of all ages a chance to experience first-hand the environmental benefits of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

Based on a classic driving game, the Hyundai sponsored exhibit challenges drivers to take the hydrogen-powered Tucson Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle for a virtual spin. Continue reading:
Hyundai Donation Fuels Opening of New Science World Exhibit: Check it Out for the Next 3 Years!

New Interactive Exhibit Comes to the Museum of Vancouver: Wearable, touchable art

Photo sourced from MuseumofVancouver.ca

Photo sourced from MuseumofVancouver.ca

In most museums, works of art are meant to be respectfully observed from a distance.  Not so in the latest exhibit at the Museum of Vancouver.

Lively Objects, which debuted earlier this month, consists largely of objects that call out to be picked up, held, interacted with and admired. Artworks vibrate – sometimes quite literally – with mechanical, digital and even “magical” forces. The result is an exhibition that turns the traditional museum experience on its head – instead of quietly awaiting our appreciation, the exhibits demand our attention.

Visitors wander through galleries filled with multiple pieces of interactive art in a variety of forms – from special gloves to machines and projected images. Some works hide in plain sight and may only catch the eye of an astute passerby. Others make a ruckus and force interaction.  Continue reading:
New Interactive Exhibit Comes to the Museum of Vancouver: Wearable, touchable art

“Vancouver Special” Home Exhibit Reflects on City’s Real Estate Boom

Photo sourced from yourvancouverrealestate.ca

Photo sourced from yourvancouverrealestate.ca

The term “Vancouver Special” refers to a style of home design in the city popular from the ’60s through the ’80s.  These two-storey houses, often with brick and stucco facades, aren’t much to look at, architecturally speaking.  But they were designed to be affordable and to maximize square footage on small lots, important features for the influx of immigrants and other buyers who snatched them up.

Now, a new exhibit by artist Ken Lum – best known locally for designing the iconic East Van cross – is looking back at the heyday of the Vancouver Special, with a bit of nostalgia for a bygone era of affordability in the city.  Titled Vancouver Especially, the exhibit consists of a scale model of a Vancouver Special-style home, built on a vacant plot of land on the edge of Vancouver’s Chinatown.   Continue reading:
“Vancouver Special” Home Exhibit Reflects on City’s Real Estate Boom

“Body Worlds for Fish”: See preserved sharks and giant squid (from the inside) at Vancouver Aquarium

Photo sourced from Vancouver Aquarium

Silky Shark. Photo sourced from Vancouver Aquarium

Remember Body Worlds? Back in 2010, the exhibit – which displays preserved human bodies in lifelike poses – made waves when it appeared at Vancouver’s Science World. Well, the same technology is now at the forefront of a brand new exhibition at the Vancouver Aquarium featuring sharks, giant squid and other fish.

Sea Monsters Revealed, on through Sept. 7, shows the internal anatomy of various sea creatures in vivid detail.  Through the miracle of plastination – which replaces water and fat in tissues with a special plastics to halt decay – viewers can get a glimpse inside the kind of fearsome predators of the deep you normally want to admire only at a distance.   Continue reading:
“Body Worlds for Fish”: See preserved sharks and giant squid (from the inside) at Vancouver Aquarium

Rare Ansel Adams Photos of Wartime Internment Camps Now in Vancouver

game

Ansel Adams, “Baseball game,” Manzanar Relocation Center, 1943. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division)

On Feb 24, 1942, a few months after Pearl Harbor, a new provision of the War Measures Act passed, giving the Canadian government power to intern all “persons of Japanese racial origin.” So began the sad chapter of Canadian history in which some 22,000 Japanese-Canadians were uprooted and placed in internment camps throughout the country – a policy that didn’t end completely until 1949.

A new exhibit at Vancouver’s Pendulum Gallery shines a new spotlight on that era, with vintage photos from legendary landscape photographer Ansel Adams and local photographer Leonard Frank.  Together, the collection offers two very distinct perspectives on internment in Canada and the U.S.

Angered by the U.S. government’s own policy of Japanese internment, Ansel Adams set off to document the injustices of the practice.  From 1943-1944, he made multiple trips at his own expense to the Manzanar War Relocation Center in California.

Continue reading:
Rare Ansel Adams Photos of Wartime Internment Camps Now in Vancouver