Irish coming-of-age film Metal Heart and five more to see at this year’s European Film Festival

A scene from the Irish film Metal Heart.

From Nov. 22-Dec. 2, The Cinematheque (1131 Howe St.) presents its annual European Film Festival. Among the more than two dozen films, the selections include a ghost story from Malta, a political comedy from Croatia, and a coming-of-age story about two fraternal twins from Ireland. See more about these films and others below.

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Irish coming-of-age film Metal Heart and five more to see at this year’s European Film Festival

Getting down and dirty with pre-Code Hollywood at Cinematheque

Damaged Lives was the first feature from Austrian émigré and future Poverty Row auteur Edgar G. Ulmer (Detour).

Film noir, horror, and “sheer Poverty Row audacity” are on the menu in Cinematheque’s Down and Dirty in Gower Gulch: Poverty Row Films Preserved by UCLA.

Most of the features date from Hollywood’s less-censorious pre-Code era. All were produced on Hollywood’s so-called Poverty Row in small, fly-by-night studios that churned out inexpensive pictures for the B-movie markets. These bargain-basement stakes made for a certain artistic freedom: controversial or risqué subjects the big studios wouldn’t touch could be explored; and directors enjoyed a degree of licence.

The program of lurid, low-budget treasures runs from April 11-29 and includes six films. And, in a throwback to how movies used to be presented in that era, each feature will be preceded by a newsreel and short subject. All titles were restored by the UCLA Film & Television Archive. According to Jan-Christopher Horak, director of the archive: “These ‘orphan films’ are worthy of restoration and presentation. They visualize many of the repressed or forbidden themes that preoccupy the nether regions of the American psyche. Get ready for a wild ride!”

Find out more below.

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Getting down and dirty with pre-Code Hollywood at Cinematheque

Social justice, pioneering filmmakers and jazz giants at this year’s DOXA Documentary Film Fest

Baljit Sangra’s Because We Are Girls

A B.C. film about three sisters from a conservative Indo-Canadian family coming to terms with the sexual abuse opens the 18th annual DOXA Documentary Film Festival.

On May 3, Baljit Sangra’s Because We Are Girls kicks off the festival, which runs May 2 – May 12. Western Canada’s largest documentary film festival, DOXA will present 82 films (shorts and features) from across Canada and around the world. See below for more highlights of this year’s DOXA.

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Social justice, pioneering filmmakers and jazz giants at this year’s DOXA Documentary Film Fest

Where to see Academy Award-nominated films this weekend

Andrew Chesworth and Bobby Pontillas’s One Small Step is nominated in the Best Animated Short category at this year’s Academy Awards.

As of this writing, the 91st Academy Awards are just a few days away. Fortunately, if you’re not caught up, Vancity Theatre (1181 Seymour St.) and the Rio Theatre (1660 E. Broadway at Commercial) are both screening some of the nominated films. See below for more info (and click on theatre names for tickets).

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Where to see Academy Award-nominated films this weekend

Six flicks to see at this year’s European Film Festival

A scene from the 2017 Austrian film Mademoiselle Paradis (Licht).

The Cinematheque (1131 Howe St.) presents its 21st Annual European Film Festival (Nov. 23 – Dec. 4). In this year’s fest, 26 EU members countries contribute one of their best films from recent years. Selections range from dramas to comedies to documentaries, and include award winners, official Oscar submissions, and many Vancouver premieres.

We’ve gone through the selections and chosen six that look like best bets, including a thriller from Slovakia, a time-travel comedy from Portugal, and a drama from Ireland. See below for details.

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Six flicks to see at this year’s European Film Festival

Cinematheque presents the premiere of acclaimed new Argentine film about European colonialism

A scene from Zama, the latest film from Argentine provocateur Lucrecia Martel. The acclaimed 2017 movie screens at The Cinematheque as part of a career retrospective.

The Cinematheque is presenting the Vancouver premiere of the first film in nearly a decade from the Argentine auteur behind the acclaimed 2008 thriller The Headless Woman.

Zama is the acclaimed latest film from Argentinian director Lucrecia Martel. To coincide with its Vancouver premiere of the 2017 movie, The Cinematheque presents I Feel You: The Films of Lucrecia Martel. The mid-career retrospective features four films from what cinematheque.ca calls “the Argentine auteur’s fiercely-original, highly-sensorial body of work.”

Screenings run June 1-10 at the downtown rep theatre, with opening night featuring a screening of Zama. UBC Film Studies lecturer Dr. Christine Evans will introduce the film. Find out more about the films below.

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Cinematheque presents the premiere of acclaimed new Argentine film about European colonialism

Vancouver, Russian, and Arctic Circle filmmakers featured at this year’s Women in Film festival

A scene from Porcupine Lake, one of the films at this year’s Vancouver International Women in Film Festival.

Adolescent growing pains, military conscription and small-town redemption are among the subjects in films at this year’s Vancouver International Women in Film Festival.

A co-presentation of Women in Film and Television and the VIFF Vancity Theatre, the 13th annual edition runs March 6 to 11. Celebrating the best of cinema created by women. the festival als features  film panels, master classes, guest filmmakers, artist talks, pitch sessions, receptions, and an awards gala. All screenings take place at Vancity Theatre (1181 Seymour St.).

See below for some of the highlights of the festival.

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Vancouver, Russian, and Arctic Circle filmmakers featured at this year’s Women in Film festival