Vancouver-made docudrama about Canada’s forgotten Evel Knievel opens today

Aim for the Roses is a 2016 docudrama that tells the story of Canadian stuntman Ken Carter.

Aim for the Roses is a 2016 docudrama that tells the story of Canadian stuntman Ken Carter.

A new Vancouver-made documentary about an obscure but ambitious Canadian stuntman begins its Vancouver theatrical run today, Dec. 2, at Vancity Theatre.

Aim for the Roses has been described as “Errol Morris and Philip Glass meets Super Dave Osborne” – that is, a film that combines the vision and/or investigative abilities of an incisive documentarian with the musical acumen of a neo-classical composer brought to bear on the subject of a semi-amateur, showboating daredevil/stuntman. We’re not sure about that. What we do know is that, to some, Ken Carter – the film’s subject (and not to be confused with the American basketball coach) – is the Canadian Evel Knievel, and filmmaker John Bolton’s docudrama tells his story, as well as the story of one of his biggest fans.

Continue reading:
Vancouver-made docudrama about Canada’s forgotten Evel Knievel opens today

‘How perfectly ripping!’ A glimpse of Vancouver over the decades

vancouver-archive-pic-2

From Vancouver: Exponential Change.

A new collection of vintage film clips shows us how Vancouverites have spent their leisure hours over the years. A 1928 home-made melodrama, a ribald mid-century PNE, a promotional film extolling a Vancouver Honeymoon, and clips from Expo 86 and Vancouver’s centennial celebrations are among the highlights of Vancouver: Exponential Change.

Featuring newly digitized film and video, the collection was put together by the City of Vancouver Archives as part of an annual series. Vancouver: Exponential Change screens at Vancity Theatre (1181 Seymour St.) Nov. 20, along with the 2014 selection Vancouver – A Progressive City, and Nov. 27. But wait, there’s more!

Continue reading:
‘How perfectly ripping!’ A glimpse of Vancouver over the decades

The messier side of life in Vancouver and more in B.C. film series

Double_Happiness

A scene from Mina Shum’s Double Happiness.

Looking for a way to spend a Monday night in Vancouver? The series The Image Before Us: A History of Film in British Columbia continues with screenings at Cinematheque (1131 Howe in downtown Vancouver) on March 30, April 13 and April 20.

The films include a look at the messier side of life in Vancouver, a documentary about the worst terrorist incident in Canadian history and one of the most talked-about Canadian films of the 1990s.

Continue reading:
The messier side of life in Vancouver and more in B.C. film series